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David Deaton

David Deaton

Digital Editor at Oklahoma Welcome

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Wednesday, 20 April 2016 15:18

Charles “Charlie” Hooper

Charles “Charlie” Hooper was born on July 9. 1938 to Alfred and Elvie (Douglas) Hooper in Charleston, Arkansas and passed away on April 19, 2016 in Fort Smith, Arkansas at the age of 77 years.


Charles is survived by his wife, Viola of the home; three daughters, Charlesa Roseanna Ginn and husband Wesley of Muldrow, OK.; Tonya Renae Sharp and husband Dan of Dayton, TX, and Sheila Kittell and husband Kevin of Tulsa, OK., three sons, Ryan C Hooper and wife Cindie of Van Buren, AR., Robert Keith Gravlee and wife Mely of Poteau, OK., and Chuck Ingram and wife of Dardneal, AR.; nine grandchildren, Jeremy Gravlee, Joshua Gravlee, Shane Ginn, Dakota Ginn, Kristion Hooper,Daniel Gravlee, Wesely Ginn, Mikki Gravlee and Rachel Gravlee; three step grandchildren, Farin Whited, Rebecca Gasparratto, and Jessica Oliver; and two sisters, Nealie Thornburg and husband Allen of Broken Arrow, OK., and Wanda Christian of Tulsa, OK.


Charles was preceded in death by his parents; one sister Ester Burgess; and one brother, Archie Hooper.

 

He was a member of the Poteau Church of Christ.

 

He worked at the Fort Smith Water Department, he owned and operated a service station in Shady Point, OK., he done carpentry work and was also a bus driver for Spiro Schools and Poteau Vo-Tech.


Funeral services will be held at 10am Saturday, April 23, 2016 at Mallory Martin Chapel of Spiro.

 

Interment will follow at Spiro City Cemetery.

 

Arrangements have been entrusted to the care and direction of Mallory Martin Funeral Home of Spiro.

 

Condolences can be made to the family on Charles’s online guestbook at www.mallorymartinfuneralhome.com

Wednesday, 20 April 2016 15:02

SOUTHEAST AREA FISHING REPORT

A service of the Oklahoma Wildlife Department

 

 

Arbuckle: April 16. Elevation above normal, water 64 and clear. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass good on Alabama rigs, jigs and worms at 6 ft. along weed beds, in the main lake, coves and spawning beds. Crappie and sunfish good on grubs, live bait, jigs and hair jigs at 16 ft. around docks, channels and weed beds. White bass excellent on in-line spinnerbaits, sassy shad, small lures, lipless baits and roadrunners at 4-10 ft. along the river channel and in the creeks. Channel catfish fair on minnows around rocks and standing timber. Sunfish good on live bait around docks. Report submitted by Jack Melton. 


Blue River: April 19. Water murky. All fishing slow due to rain. Report submitted by Matt Gamble, biologist at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

 

Broken Bow: April 18. Elevation normal, water 59. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass good on crankbaits, jerk baits and spinnerbaits at 5-8 ft. along flats, weed beds and shorelines. Crappie good on minnows, tube jigs and jigs at 3-5 ft. around brush structure and weed beds. Channel, blue and flathead catfish good on chicken liver, worms and sunfish at 10-15 ft. along creek channels and the river channel. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.


Eufaula: April 17. Elevation normal, water clearing. White bass good on minnows, jigs and Alabama rigs below the dam and along coves. Blue catfish good on live shad and worms below the dam and around points. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around docks, standing timber and creek channels. Striped bass fair on hair jigs, live shad and topwater lures below the dam. Report submitted by Cody Jones, game warden stationed in McIntosh County.  

Hugo: April 17. Elevation normal, water 62. Crappie and largemouth bass good on minnows and jigs at 2-10 ft. along shallows and creek channels. Largemouth and spotted bass fair on spinnerbaits and tube jigs at 5-10 ft. along shallows and brush structure. Blue catfish fair on minnows and shad at 5-15 ft. below the dam and along the river channel. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw and Bryan counties.

 

Konawa: April 18. Elevation normal, water 61 and murky. Largemouth bass fair on jerk baits, spinnerbaits and sassy shad at 6-10 ft. along coves, weed beds and the discharge. White bass fair on jigs, worms, shad and slabs at 6-12 ft. along the discharge and points. Channel catfish good on chicken liver, worms, stinkbait and shrimp at 8-12 ft. along the discharge and creek channels. Report submitted by Tyler Howser, game warden stationed in Seminole County.


Lower Mountain Fork: April 17. Elevation normal, water 55 and clear. Trout good on worms and PowerBait along spillway. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County. 

 

McGee Creek: April 17. Elevation normal, water 63 and clear. Largemouth and spotted bass fair on plastic baits at 2-10 ft. around brush structure and standing timber. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 6-20 ft. around brush structure and docks. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County. 

 

Murray: April 19. Elevation above normal, water 58 and stained. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass good on crankbaits, plastic baits and spinnerbaits at 3-10 ft. along shallows, weed beds and rocks. White bass fair on minnows, jigs, sassy shad and crankbaits at 4-12 ft. along creek channels, coves and points. Crappie fair on minnows, jigs and tube jigs at 4-10 ft. around brush structure, standing timber and riprap. Walleye slow on crankbaits, sassy shad, tube jigs and minnows at 3-10 ft. around rocks, sandbars and points. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County.


Pine Creek: April 17. Elevation below normal, water 67 and clear. Crappie excellent on jigs, spinnerbaits and tube jigs along shorelines, points and brush structure. Largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits along creek channels and points. Channel catfish good on chicken liver in the main lake and around standing timber. Flathead catfish good on sunfish in the main lake and along the river channel. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

 

Robert S. Kerr: April 17. Elevation normal, water murky. Largemouth and spotted bass good on Alabama rigs, spinnerbaits and flukes along shorelines, weed beds and coves. Crappie good on minnows and jigs along weed beds and creek channels. Blue and channel catfish good on shad, cut bait, stinkbait and dough bait along the river channel, flats and channels. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Haskell County. 

 

Sardis: April 13. Elevation above normal, water 62. Largemouth and smallmouth bass good on spinnerbaits, tube jigs and plastic baits at 4-6 ft. along shorelines and brush structure. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs at 2-9 ft. around brush structure, rocks and shorelines. Blue and channel catfish good on cut bait and shad at 10-14 ft. along channels, coves and the main lake. Report submitted by Dane Polk, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County.

 

Texoma: April 17. Elevation 2 ft. below normal, water 63 and murky in the north and clear in the south. Largemouth and smallmouth bass good on crankbaits, jigs and plastic baits at 5-20 ft. around brush structure, riprap and creek channels. Striped and white bass good on live shad, sassy shad, slabs and ghost minnows at 10-20 ft. below the dam, along the river channel and coves. Channel and blue catfish good on stinkbait, worms, live shad and ghost minnows at 5-20 ft. below the dam, along riprap, active cleaning stations and creek channels. Crappie, sunfish and white bass good on minnows, small lures and ghost minnows at 5-15 ft. around brush structure, shorelines and creek channels. Paddlefish good at 10-20 ft. below the dam when generating. Report submitted by Danny Clubb, game warden stationed in Bryan County.

 

Wister: April 17. Elevation normal, water 63 and murky. Largemouth bass good on bill baits and spinnerbaits in chartreuse/white-silver/pearl at 5-10 ft. along channels and points. Crappie excellent on minnows, jigs, Mike's baits in silver/pearl and Timmy Tom jig heads at 4-6 ft. along channels and brush structure. Report submitted by Randy Fennell, game warden stationed in Le Flore County. 

George Glenn Shelter Insurance is sponsoring a hole at the annual Cherokee Nation Casino/CASC Scholarship Scramble.

 

This year’s scramble is at Shadow Creek Country Club on May 21, 2016.

 

Funds raised go to provide Carl Albert State College scholarships to area students.

 

Pictured are Randall "Rat" Baker and CASC’s Paul Marshall.

OKLAHOMA CITY – The Senate gave unanimous approval to legislation Tuesday to allow judges to consider post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a mitigating factor when making sentencing decisions for veterans. Sen. Frank Simpson is the Senate principal author of House Bill 2595, which he says will help veterans get the assistance they need rather than being sent to jail.


“We send our veterans overseas to fight and they face situations that we couldn’t imagine in our worst nightmares. They suffer physical, emotional and mental wounds. The physical wounds are easy to treat because they can be seen but the others are not,” said Simpson, R-Springer. “When they return, if they don’t get the proper treatment to deal with their PTSD, they may unexplainably lash out violently at others or turn to alcohol and drugs to numb themselves, which can land them in court. They are not criminals, they are wounded heroes and they deserve special consideration from the courts.”


The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs says that eleven percent of Afghanistan and Iraq veterans and 15 percent of Vietnam veterans have been diagnosed with PTSD but that many others go undiagnosed because they do not seek treatment.


Various studies have found that at least 30 percent of men and women who have spent time in war zones experience PTSD and an additional 20 to 25 percent have had partial PTSD at some point in their lives.


Oklahoma has two PTSD diversion programs, one in Oklahoma County and another in Tulsa County.


HB 2595 is supported by the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Oklahoma Secretary of Veteran’s Affairs Rita Aragon and other military organizations and groups.


The bill now moves to the governor’s office for her final consideration.

The full Senate has given its approval to a bill supporters say will enable more cold cases to be solved in Oklahoma. Sen. Clark Jolley and Rep. Lee Denney are the principal authors of HB 2275, which amends current law so that DNA samples could be collected upon arrest for a felony crime. The DNA would be collected through a sample of saliva.


“Right now Oklahoma collects DNA upon conviction for felonies and certain misdemeanors. We’re in the minority of states that don’t do this upon arrest,” said Jolley, R-Edmond. “We collect fingerprints upon arrest, but DNA identification is much more accurate. This will enable us to solve crimes as well as cold cases for some of those most heinous crimes in our state and it will also prevent future crimes by making sure the true culprit is behind bars.”


Jolley said the bill requires a person’s DNA information to be expunged from the database if charges are dropped or if the defendant is not bound over for trial after their arraignment. He noted HB 2275 amends Juli’s Law, named for University of Oklahoma ballet student Juli Buskin, whose cold case homicide was finally solved after Oklahoma initially expanded the DNA database.


“This will enable us to solve more crimes like Juli Buskin's and bring more closure to Oklahoma families who are waiting for law enforcement to finally be able to identify the person that murdered their child,” Jolley said.


Denney said the legislation was very important for the state of Oklahoma.


“Especially in the light of us looking at justice reform and the people we lock up. I think we need to be locking up the people we’re scared of,” said Denney, R-Cushing. “DNA, as I’ve always said, will convict the guilty and exonerate the innocent.”


HB 2275 now goes to the governor for her consideration.

OKLAHOMA CITY – A measure to track and keep repeat impaired drivers off Oklahoma roads passed the Senate unanimously Tuesday. House Bill 3146, authored by Sen. Greg Treat and Rep. Mike Sanders, will require all driving under the influence (DUI) cases to be handled by courts of record.


“This bill closes a loophole that has put Oklahomans’ lives in danger by allowing repeat drunk drivers to get multiple DUI convictions in various jurisdictions without being held accountable,” said Treat, R-Oklahoma City. “There are 350 courts not of record in Oklahoma that don’t report DUI convictions to a statewide database. Therefore, someone could get arrested twenty or more times in multiple jurisdictions for DUI and because those convictions aren’t put on their record they’re treated like a first time offender and receive only minimal punishment.”


Currently, Oklahoma City and Tulsa are the state’s only municipal courts of record. Only those convicted in these two courts are held accountable on subsequent offenses because their crimes are reported to the Oklahoma Supreme Court Network.


Under HB 3146, municipal courts not of record will no longer be eligible to hear DUI cases. Any municipality with a population of 60,000 or more has the option to create a court of record. DUI cases in jurisdictions with courts not of record will be referred to district court.

 

Arresting municipalities will still receive a portion of the fines.


Rep. Sanders and his family were the victims of a drunk driver who rear-ended them last year. The individual had six open containers in his vehicle and four DUI convictions in the previous year. He received another DUI citation two weeks after hitting the Sanders’ family.


“This is an important tool for prosecutors to be able to better flag and appropriately prosecute repeat drunk drivers,” said Sanders, R-Kingfisher. “The security of Oklahoma families when they are driving on our roads should always be a top priority in public safety.”


The bill requires the state Department of Public Safety, with the help of the Office of Management and Enterprise Services, to create a statewide impaired driver database to better track offenders to be funded by fines on offenders.


The bill now heads to the Governor’s desk for her consideration.

According to the Oklahoma Department of Transportation, Norman drivers should plan now for the next and most challenging phase of the massive Oklahoma Department of Transportation project to widen I-35 to six lanes and reconstruct two interchanges. Beginning Tuesday, April 26, the Lindsey St. bridge over I-35 will be closed until the new Single Point Urban Interchange is completed in early 2017. All I-35 on- and off-ramps at Lindsey St. will also be closed. Travelers to and from University of Oklahoma commencement ceremonies, sporting events and other university activities should use the on- and off-ramps at SH-9 East.


Before the project began in early 2015, ODOT announced that the Lindsey St. bridge and ramps would have to be temporarily closed to facilitate construction of the new interchange. The closure of the Lindsey St. bridge has been put off as long as possible, but work has progressed to the point that it must be deconstructed to make way for the new SPUI.


The good news is that work was phased so that the new SH-9 East interchange will open as an alternate route for Lindsey St. traffic. Beginning Tuesday, SH-9 East will provide new access to through traffic between the Ed Noble Parkway/28th Ave. S.W. on the west side of I-35 and 24th Ave. S.W. just east of the interstate. These routes will serve as the detour for Lindsey St. until early 2017.


When work is completed, the new Lindsey St. SPUI will feature longer I-35 on- and off-ramps, a wider bridge and single array of traffic signals similar to the Main St. interchange. These features allow a SPUI to move a large amount of traffic more efficiently than other interchanges.


The public can view traffic advisories for the Oklahoma City metro area including Norman or sign up to receive them by email at www.odot.org. Drivers should continue to expect delays and congestion on I-35, especially during peak travel periods, like rush hour, weekends and holidays.


The $71 million contract for this project was awarded by the Oklahoma Transportation Commission in December 2014 and work began in March 2015. It is currently the single largest contract awarded for an ODOT project. The contractor, Sherwood Construction Co. of Tulsa, has a very aggressive work schedule in place and stands to earn up to $2 million in financial incentives for early completion.


As part of this project, the City of Norman partnered with ODOT to construct a drainage structure and add artwork and landscaping to the new Lindsey St. bridge. The City of Norman is also improving Lindsey St. east of I-35 as part of a separate project.


More information on the city’s project can be found at www.lindseystreetnorman.com

 

OKLAHOMA CITY – According to a press release from the Oklahoma Insurance Commissioner, Commissioner John D. Doak has ordered a public hearing to investigate a rise in earthquake insurance rates. The May 24 hearing will include data gathered by the Oklahoma Insurance Department as well as comments from insurers and citizens.

 

“This is a proactive move to protect consumers,” said Doak. “We’ve seen some rate increase filings up to 100 percent come through the office and we want to make sure we have a reasonably competitive market. There needs to be a valid financial basis for any rate increase and healthy competition that benefits consumers.”

 

State Rating Laws
Under state law, property and casualty rates adhere to the “use and file” system. Under the “use and file” system, insurers may implement a rate increase then notify the Oklahoma Insurance Department after the fact. However, if the line of business is not competitive the rating laws revert to a “prior approval” system. Under a “prior approval” system, rates must be filed and approved before they can be used.

 

Concerns About Competitiveness
The purpose of the hearing is to determine whether there is a reasonable degree of competition in the Oklahoma earthquake insurance market. Commissioner Doak has concerns about the competitiveness of earthquake insurance because:


• Recent filings have not substantiated the need for increased rates.
• The prevalence of multi-line discounts makes it difficult for a consumer to switch carriers to get a lower price or a lower deductible on earthquake insurance.
• 70 percent of earthquake insurance policies in Oklahoma are sold by just a few companies.
Public Hearing
During the hearing, Commissioner Doak will consider:
• The number of insurers actively writing coverage
• Market share information
• Economic barriers that could prevent new carriers from entering the market
• Market concentration
• Whether long-term profitability for insurers in the market is reasonable
• The relationship between insurers’ costs and revenue


The hearing is scheduled for May 24 from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. at the Oklahoma Insurance Department, 3625 NW 56th St., Suite 100, Oklahoma City. Any person who wishes to be heard must notify the Department in advance by emailing General Counsel Gordon Amini at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. no later than May 17. The hearing notice is available here.

 

Comments will be strictly limited to the issues of competition and pricing in the earthquake insurance market. The hearing is not a forum to discuss complaints about claim denials or manmade causes of earthquakes. There is a limited time for public comment. If some citizens do not get a chance to speak, they will be asked to provide a written testimony.

 

OID Gathering Claims Data
The Oklahoma Insurance Department is in the process of collecting earthquake claims data from 2010-present. This will allow the Department to analyze payments and ensure fair claims handling is taking place.

 

“I am responsible for making sure consumers are protected and that insurers are financially solvent,” said Doak. “Gathering this data helps me accomplish both goals.”

 

 

About the Oklahoma Insurance Department
The Oklahoma Insurance Department, an agency of the State of Oklahoma, is responsible for the education and protection of the insurance-buying public and for oversight of the insurance industry in the state.

State Health Department Implementing Preparedness and Testing for Zika Virus


According to a press release from the Oklahoma State Deparment of Health, as public health and medical professionals are learning more about the effects of the Zika virus, the Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) continues to broaden efforts to work with health care providers to identify potential travel-related cases, conduct testing in the state public health laboratory, and expand mosquito surveillance programs to determine presence and burden of the type of mosquito that is most likely to spread Zika virus.


Presently, the Zika virus is not being spread by mosquitoes in the US, but is spreading aggressively in regions of South and Central America and the Caribbean. As more travelers acquire Zika virus abroad and summer approaches, there is a potential for localized transmission to occur in the southern US, especially in states where the Aedes aegypti mosquito is plentiful. Collections of this type of mosquito in Oklahoma are not commonly recorded.


The most significant health risk of Zika virus infection is among pregnant women and their unborn babies. A study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently established that infection with Zika virus during pregnancy can result in fetal loss or severe birth defects involving the brain.


Measures implemented by OSDH to identify potential travel-related Zika virus cases among Oklahoma residents include a screening tool for maternity clinics and protocols for health care providers to assess information on patients to determine if Zika virus testing is indicated. OSDH Acute Disease Service epidemiologists are available 24/7 to consult with health care providers statewide to determine if their patients meet the criteria for testing and arrange for testing to be conducted.


OSDH has received confirmation of four travel-related cases affecting Oklahoma residents through test results provided by the CDC Arbovirus Laboratory in Ft. Collins, CO. One of the Oklahoma cases is a pregnant woman. The OSDH Public Health Laboratory has completed proficiency testing for Zika virus and has begun testing of specimens from Oklahoma patients to alleviate the delay in receiving results from the CDC.


Zika virus is transmitted to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes aegypti mosquito. It can also be spread through sexual contact with males who have the virus or from mother to unborn child. The disease can cause fever, rash, muscle and joint aches and red eyes. These symptoms typically last several days to a week, and hospitalizations are rare. Most people exposed to Zika virus won’t develop any symptoms at all.


“We are strongly recommending that pregnant women and spouses or sexual partners of women who are pregnant or might be pregnant, avoid traveling to areas where Zika virus has been identified if at all possible,” said Oklahoma State Epidemiologist Dr. Kristy Bradley. If travel cannot be avoided, persons in these high risk groups should rigorously practice mosquito bite precautions and notify their health care provider if any symptoms of illness occur within 2 weeks of travel.


OSDH has also enlisted the help of the Oklahoma State University Department of Entomology to conduct surveillance in five urban regions across the state for the presence of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The Oklahoma City-County and Tulsa Health Departments also have plans to expand their mosquito surveillance to monitor for the presence of this Zika virus vector in addition to trapping and testing of Culex mosquitoes, which spread West Nile virus.


The CDC and OSDH advise pregnant women to delay travel to foreign countries and U.S. territories where Zika virus is being transmitted. To prevent the spread of the disease, people traveling to those areas should carefully follow steps to avoid mosquito bites while there and for seven days after returning home.


Mosquito exposure prevention tips while traveling to affected areas include:


• Use air conditioning or window/door screens to keep mosquitoes outside. If you are not able to protect yourself from mosquitoes inside your hotel or sleeping place, sleep under a mosquito bed net.
• Use mosquito repellents according to instructions.
• If weather permits, wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
• Treat clothing and gear with permethrin or purchase permethrin-treated items
• Help reduce the number of mosquitoes outside your residence, hotel room or workplace by emptying standing water from containers, such as flowerpots or buckets.

 


For more information on the Zika virus, visit www.ok.gov/health for links to fact sheets in English, Spanish and Portuguese, information from the CDC and World Health Organization (WHO) along with the most recent statistics on cases.



Monday, 18 April 2016 17:13

List of Top Safest Cities in Oklahoma

BackgroundChecks.org released its Annual "Safest Cities in Oklahoma" report for 2016.


To compile the report, BackgroundChecks.org combined data from recent FBI Crime Reports, natural language analysis, social media sentiment analysis and their own research to create a ranking of the 25 Safest Cities in Oklahoma.


"It's a true testament to great policing, strong leadership, and community involvement", said Jessica Pierce, a BackgroundChecks.org public safety analyst. "In a world full of bad news, it's great to have something positive for residents, and it's something to be proud of."

 

About BackgroundChecks.org
BackgroundChecks.org is a public safety focused organization committed to increasing public safety, community involvement, transparent government, and education. For useful information for Oklahoma residents, you can check out their Oklahoma Public Records page.

 

1 Edmond

 

Located in Oklahoma County, the city of Edmond is home to 81,400 residents. Considered a suburb of Oklahoma City, the community is the site of the University of Central Oklahoma as well as the home office of Homeland supermarkets, and was included on CNBC’s list of “10 Perfect Suburbs.” Edmond is the safest place to live in Oklahoma, with a violent crime rate of 101.8, and the chance of being affected by property crime here just 2%.

 

#2 Choctaw

 

Another city in Oklahoma County, Choctaw is home to 15,200 residents. Located just 10 miles from Oklahoma City, the community is the oldest chartered town in the state and is known for its popular eight-day Oktoberfest sponsored by the city each year. Another safe place to call home, the violent crime rate in Choctaw is 122.4, and the chance of being involved in a property crime here is just 1.8%.

 

#3 Moore

 

Located in Cleveland County, the city of Moore is home to 55,000 residents. The community sits between Oklahoma City and Norman and is the site of a large Veterans Memorial, which was destroyed by a 2013 tornado but then rebuilt. The violent crime rate in Moore is 135.9, and residents have a 4.2% chance of being affected by property crime.

 

#4 Yukon

 

A city in Canadian County, Yukon is home to 22,700 residents. Considered a suburb of Oklahoma City, the community was named after the Yukon Territory in Canada and was historically a mill town. The violent crime rate here is 139.6, and residents of Yukon have a 2.4% chance of being involved in a property crime.

 

#5 Norman

 

Located in Cleveland County, the city of Norman has a current population of 118,000 residents. Also the county seat, the community is just 20 miles south of Oklahoma City, is home to the University of Oklahoma, and was included on CNN Money’s list of best small cities in the U.S. The violent crime rate in Norman is 151.8, and the chance of being affected by property crime here is just 2.6%.

 

#6 Guthrie

 

A city in Logan County, Guthrie is home to 10,100 residents. Also the county seat, the community has many historic properties, is a popular rodeo event location, and is known for its annual Oklahoma International Bluegrass Festival. The violent crime rate here is 153.7, and residents of Guthrie have a 3% chance of being involved in a property crime.

 

#7 Broken Arrow

 

Located primarily in Tulsa County, the city of Broken Arrow is home to 98,800 residents. Considered the largest suburb of Tulsa, the community was originally agriculture-based but now hosts some large companies such as FlightSafety International and Blue Bell Creameries. The violent crime rate in Broken Arrow is 153.9, and the chance of being affected by property crime here is 2.1%.

 

#8 Mustang

 

A city in southeastern Canadian County, Mustang is home to 17,300 residents. Considered a suburb of Oklahoma City, the community encompasses 12 square miles and is served by the Mustang Public School District. The violent crime rate here is 160.1, and residents of Mustang have a 2.4% chance of being involved in a property crime.

 

#9 Jenks

 

Located in Tulsa County, the city of Jenks is home to 16,900 residents. This fast-growing community is considered a suburb of Tulsa, is situated along the Arkansas River, and is the site of the Oklahoma Aquarium. The violent crime rate in Jenks is 179.9, and the chance of being affected by property crime here is just 1.6%.

 

#10 Sand Springs

 

A city in Osage and Tulsa counties, Sand Springs is home to 18,900 residents. Another Tulsa suburb, this community was an early leader in glass manufacturing and is served by the Sand Springs School District. The violent crime rate here is 181.7, and residents of Sand Springs have a 4% chance of being involved in a property crime.

 

#11 Elk City

 

Located in Beckham County, Elk City is home to 11,600 residents. The community is over 100 miles west of Oklahoma City and serves as a center of commerce for the western part of the state. Energy production is dominant here, and the city has a large regional medical center. The violent crime rate in Elk City is 185.5, and the chance of being affected by property crime here is 2.7%.

 

#12 Owasso

 

A city in Rogers and Tulsa counties, Owasso is home to 28,900 residents. Considered a northern suburb of Tulsa, the community’s area is known as “Green Country” for its hills, lakes, and green vegetation. Major employers in the city include Whirlpool, Nordham Group, and American Airlines. The violent crime rate here is 186.4, and residents of Owasso have a 2.5% chance of being involved in a property crime.

 

#13 Sapulpa

 

Located in Creek and Tulsa counties, the city of Sapulpa is home to 20,500 residents. Also the county seat of Creek County, the community has a history in the production of walnuts, bricks, and glass, earning the nickname “The Crystal City of the Southwest.” The violent crime rate in Sapulpa is 235.4, and the chance of being affected by property crime here is just 2.3%.

 

#14 Guymon

 

A city in Texas County, Guymon is home to 11,400 residents. Also the county seat, the community’s economy is diverse and dominated by such things as energy production, cattle feedlots, and corporate pork farms. The city is also known for its Guymon Pioneer Days Rodeo each May. The violent crime rate here is 243.8, and residents of Guymon have a 2.6% chance of being involved in a property crime.

 

#15 Stillwater

 

Located in Payne County, the city of Stillwater has a current population of 46,500 residents. Also the county seat, the community is home to Oklahoma State University, several high-tech businesses, and the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Museum. The violent crime rate in Stillwater is 261.2, and the chance of being affected by property crime here is 3.1%.

 

#16 Claremore

 

A city in Rogers County, Claremore is home to 18,500 residents. Also the county seat, the community is considered a suburb of Tulsa, is the site of Rogers State University, and is noted as the home of entertainer Will Rogers. The violent crime rate here is 265.1, and residents of Claremore have a 2.6% chance of being involved in a property crime.

 

#17 El Reno

 

Located in Canadian County, the city of El Reno is home to 16,700 residents. Also the county seat, the community is 25 miles west of Oklahoma City and is best known for its fried onion burger, upon which an entire festival is centered each May. The violent crime rate in El Reno is 270.5, and the chance of being affected by property crime here is 2.9%.

 

#18 Bartlesville

 

A city primarily in Washington County, Bartlesville has a current population of 36,200 residents. Also the county seat, the community is 18 miles from the Kansas state line and is noted as the longtime home of the Phillips Petroleum Company. The violent crime rate here is 272.6, and residents of Bartlesville have a 2.9% chance of being involved in a property crime.

 

#19 Tahlequah

 

Located in Cherokee County, the city of Tahlequah is home to 15,700 residents. Also the county seat, the community lies at the foothills of the Ozark Mountains, is the capital of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, and is the site of the main campus of Northeastern State University. The violent crime rate in Tahlequah is 291.6, and the chance of being affected by property crime here is 4.2%.

 

#20 McAlester

 

A city in Pittsburgh County, McAlester is home to 17,700 residents. Also the county seat, the community is the largest city in the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and is the site of the Oklahoma State Penitentiary. The violent crime rate here is 309.5, and residents of McAlester have a 5.1% chance of being involved in a property crime.

 

#21 Altus

 

Located in Jackson County, the city of Altus is home to 19,800 residents. Also the county seat, the community is home to Altus Air Force Base, as well as two colleges: Southwest Technology Center and Western Oklahoma State College. The violent crime rate in Altus is 316, and the chance of being affected by a property crime here is 3.4%.

 

#22 Enid

 

A city in Garfield County, Enid is home to 49,300 residents. The community has the third largest grain storage capacity in the world, and its economy is based on both energy and agriculture. Enid is home to the Tri-State Music Festival and major companies in the area include Atwood Distributing and Johnston Enterprises. The violent crime rate here is 329.6, and residents of Enid have a 3.9% chance of being involved in a property crime.

 

#23 Bethany

 

Located in Oklahoma County, the city of Bethany is home to 19,000 residents. Considered a suburb of Oklahoma City, the community was founded by the Church of the Nazarene and is the site of Southern Nazarene University and Southwestern Christian University. The violent crime rate in Bethany is 363.6, and the chance of being affected by property crime here is 3.6%.

 

#24 Weatherford

 

A city in Custer County, Weatherford is home to 10,800 residents. The community was incorporated in 1898, is the site of Southwestern Oklahoma State University and a Kodak manufacturing plant, and is known for its popular Stafford Air & Space Museum. The violent crime rate here is 399.8, and residents of Weatherford have a 2.3% chance of being involved in a property crime.

 

#25 Okmulgee

 

Located in Okmulgee County, the city of Okmulgee is home to 12,300 residents. The community is the capital of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation and has a diverse economy based on retail, healthcare, and construction. The violent crime rate in Okmulgee is 420.7, and the chance of being affected by property crime here is 3.7%.

 

 

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