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Tuesday August 20, 2019

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David Deaton

David Deaton

Digital Editor at Oklahoma Welcome

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Thursday, 08 August 2019 13:26

EOMC offering Childbirth class

 

 

EOMC offering Childbirth class


Eastern Oklahoma Medical Center in Poteau is offering a Childbirth class on August 19, 2019 from 5:00pm-7:00pm in the library at EOMC.


There is no charge for this class, and you will get to meet the wonderful OB staff and take a tour of the Childbirth Center.

 

Have questions or need to register? call them 918-635-3150.

 

 

 

Edna “Marie” (Williams) Howard, 98, of Pocola, OK passed away Monday, August 5, 2019 in Ft. Smith, AR.

 

Marie was born August 17, 1920 in Pocola to Harry & Lille (Kilgore) Williams.

 

She worked at Smith Box Factory, Spalding, Planters Peanuts and retired from working at Evans & Miller at the age of 92.

 

Marie was a member of the United Methodist Church of Pocola her entire life. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Joe L. “Pete” Howard; daughter, Letus Kay (Howard) Anderson; granddaughter, Shanna Lavon (Maden) Short; sister, Stella Oliver; brothers, Earl & wife Mary Lee Williams of Turlock, CA, Edgar & wife Dorothy Ann Williams of Pocola, OK; niece, Judy Rice & Michael Rice of Charleston, AR; nephew, Jimmy Williams of Washington.

 

Survivors include her brother, Ted Williams of Cedarville, AR; daughters, Cletus & James Woods of Pocola, OK, Phyllis & Larry Maden of Ft. Smith, AR; grandchildren, Tommy Dewayne Henry of Ft. Smith, AR, Kimberly Jean Woods of Pocola, OK; great grandchildren, Jessica Paige (Short) McCoy & husband Christopher of Ft. Smith, AR, Chelsea DiAnn (Short) Hansel & husband Corbin Hansel of Mansfield, AR, James William Joseph Woods “Will” & wife Kaylee Woods of Norman, OK, Daxton Parker Henry of Central City, AR; great great grandchildren, Jayden Alexander McCoy, Sophia Grace McCoy, Chase Allen Hansel, Riley Christopher McCoy, Wyatt James Woods, Finley Kay Woods (due in November); a host of many family and friends.

 

Services will be 10 am, Friday, August 9, 2019 at Evans Memorial Chapel, Pocola, OK with Dan Reid & Jim Cook officiating. Interment will follow in Macedonia Cemetery, Pocola. Pallbearers will be Wayne Henry, Scott Short, Chris McCoy, Corbin Hansel, Will Woods, Parker Henry.

 

The family will be at the funeral home in Pocola on Thursday evening from 6-8 pm to visit with relatives & friends.

 

You may leave an online message at www.evansandmillerfuneralhomes.com

 

The family has chosen to entrust the care of the services to Evans & Miller Funeral Home, POCOLA, OK

Press Release, Judy Korten, Talihina Chamber of Commerce

 

 

Our Talihina City Wide Yard Sale and Pancake Breakfast has been rescheduled with the rain date.

 

th beginning at 7 a.m., setup at 6am, continuing throughout the day.


Come early to get the bargains and the great food; baked goods, Indian tacos, etc. There has been a great response this year.

 

If you like books there are options for you; children’s books, adult self -help and inspirational. Local writers will have autographed editions, you can even meet one. There will also be designer jewelry, and clothes to help get ready for school in style. Guys there are listings for you too. Lawn mower, weed eater, clothing, boots, electrical, building materials, and hunting stuff. Don’t forget to look for Ring toss fun for the kids.


Booths will be setup at the visitors center at 201 First Street beginning at 6am. There will also be folks setting up yard sales at their home. This is a list of those who are selling from their home and their addresses and some of the items they have for sale.
David Foster- 615 Second St. Jeans, weed eater, boots, misc. items.


Mona Morris - Alley behind T-Town Vape, business back door – Building material, electronics, hunting gear.


Shelly Reeves- Set up at Talihina State Bank drive thru area.-Clothing for ladies and kids. Household items. Tools and camping equipment.

 

All profit from this event goes towards operating the visitors’ center.


See you this weekend!

 

To reserve a booth call 918-567-3434 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

By Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy CEO Joe Dorman

 

As we prepare for the end of summer vacation for many Oklahomans, both students and educators alike, I am reminded of my own days and summers growing up in Rush Springs. Our end of summer was always signified by the annual Watermelon Festival, which welcomed tens of thousands of visitors to our small town on the second Saturday of August each year (and still does to this day). After the festival, we finished our back-to-school shopping and got ready for another school year.

 

Of course, back-to-school shopping can be a significant burden for many Oklahomans with big families and modest budgets, and that is especially true of families that make the wonderful decision to foster children. That’s why I am pleased that the Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy (OICA) is partnering with First Lady Sarah Stitt and others to host two “Back to School Bash” events, where foster families can have access to free backpacks and school supplies while their children enjoy a night of movies, games and fun. The events will be held on Aug. 13 at the Governor’s Mansion and August 16 at Guthrie Green in Tulsa. Spaces are limited; if you are a foster parent attending with a child, please be sure to RSVP at HTTP://BIT.LY/STITTSCHOOLBASH.

 

OICA, thanks to generous grants and support from WalMart, Express Employment International, Simmons Bank and King Marlin Swim Club, was able to purchase more than 700 backpacks for the youth who will attend. School supplies have been donated by other organizations so families and kids can take home the essentials they need for school.

 

 

Additionally, OICA is partnering with other programs in rural parts of Oklahoma to enhance their backpack programs that aid foster youth. If you are interested in supporting, volunteering or donating to this or one of our other programs, please contact our office at oica.org or at (405) 236-5437.

 

Numbers provided by the Oklahoma Department of Human Services just last month show a clear need for these kinds of services. Of the 8,008 children in foster care, 4,287 are classified as school age (5 – 17), with 3,616 of these youth living in either an out-of-home placement, a kinship (family member) home, a foster care home with family like settings, or in congregate care (with 24-hour supervision in highly structured settings such as a group home, institution, residential treatment facility or maternity home). We are thankful that the OICA can provide some support for these young Oklahomans, working in collaboration with some great partner organizations.

 

Going forward, we hope to expand our ability to support existing back-to-school backpack programs and to empower more DHS workers to deliver these backpacks to families directly. There are several other fantastic programs working toward this goal, such as It’s a Child’s Life. This is an Ada organization which holds an annual walk to purchase luggage for DHS workers to use for kids, along with a 5K run to help raise funds to find forever homes for orphans. To learn more about their Orphan Love Mud Run on September 21, or to support their mission, go to https://www.itsachildslife.org/ for details.

 

I hope to see all our supporters at the 75th Annual Rush Springs Watermelon Festival this Saturday, and please bring a young relative or neighbor with you to this great family-friendly event! I promise, this is a fun way to celebrate the end of summer and the remaining days before school starts!

 

Tuesday, 06 August 2019 15:09

Edna “Marie” (Williams) Howard Obituary

Edna “Marie” (Williams) Howard, 98, of Pocola, OK passed away Monday, August 5, 2019 in Ft. Smith, AR.

 

Marie was born August 17, 1920 in Pocola to Harry & Lille (Kilgore) Williams.

 

She worked at Smith Box Factory, Spalding, Planters Peanuts and retired from working at Evans & Miller at the age of 92.

 

Marie was a member of the United Methodist Church of Pocola her entire life. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Joe L. “Pete” Howard; daughter, Letus Kay (Howard) Anderson; granddaughter, Shanna Lavon (Maden) Short; sister, Stella Oliver; brothers, Earl & wife Mary Lee Williams of Turlock, CA, Edgar & wife Dorothy Ann Williams of Pocola, OK; niece, Judy Rice of Charleston, AR; nephew, Jimmy Williams of Washington.

 

Survivors include her brother, Ted Williams of Cedarville, AR; daughters, Cletus & James Woods of Pocola, OK, Phyllis & Larry Maden of Ft. Smith, AR; grandchildren, Tommy Dewayne Henry of Ft. Smith, AR, Kimberly Jean Woods of Pocola, OK; great grandchildren, Jessica Paige (Short) McCoy & husband Christopher of Ft. Smith, AR, Chelsea DiAnn (Short) Hansel & husband Corbin Hansel of Mansfield, AR, James William Joseph Woods “Will” & wife Kaylee Woods of Norman, OK, Daxton Parker Henry of Central City, AR; great great grandchildren, Jayden Alexander McCoy, Sophia Grace McCoy, Chase Allen Hansel, Riley Christopher McCoy, Wyatt James Woods, Finley Kay Woods (due in November); a host of many family and friends.

 

Services will be 10 am, Friday, August 9, 2019 at Evans Memorial Chapel, Pocola, OK with Dan Reid & Jim Cook officiating.

 

Interment will follow in Macedonia Cemetery, Pocola.

 

Pallbearers will be Wayne Henry, Scott Short, Chris McCoy, Corbin Hansel, Will Woods, Parker Henry.

 

The family will be at the funeral home in Pocola on Thursday evening from 6-8 pm to visit with relatives & friends.

 

You may leave an online message at www.evansandmillerfuneralhomes.com

 

The family has chosen to entrust the care of the services to Evans & Miller Funeral Home, POCOLA, OK

Tuesday, 06 August 2019 15:05

James Kenneth Dehart Obituary

James Kenneth Dehart of Heavener, Oklahoma was born July 10, 1952 in Fort Smith, Arkansas to Leonard and Levon (Harris) Dehart and passed away August 5, 2019 in Heavener, Oklahoma at the age of 67.

 

He is survived by:

His wife:
Donna Dehart of the home

His mother:
Levon Dehart of Heavener, Oklahoma

Two daughters:
Jennifer Yandell and husband Danny of Heavener, Oklahoma
Angie Turner and husband Steve of Monroe, Oklahoma

Three sons:
Eric Dehart and wife Andrea of Heavener, Oklahoma
Wesley “Adam” Dehart and wife Niki of the Hontubby Community
Bucky Hunt and wife Michelle of Omaha, Nebraska

Two sisters:
Judy Scott and husband Garner of Broken Arrow, Oklahoma
Linda Dehart and husband John Ferguson of Fort Smith, Arkansas

Twelve grandchildren:
Tony Vaughn, Emily Yandell, Kensley Yandell, Claydin Boren, William Dehart, Shayleigh and Trace McDaniel, Addison Dehart, Jada Hunt, Abby Turner, Bucky Hunt, David Hunt

One great-grandchild:
Sophia Francis

Numerous nieces, nephews, cousins, other relatives, and a host of friends

 

He was preceded in death by Father Leonard Dehart and one brother Leonard Dehart. Kenneth was a life-long resident of Heavener, a 1971 graduate of Heavener High School, and a member of the Heavener First Baptist Church, where he was very active at the Hope Center.

 

Kenneth also loved to play golf and spend time with his family and friends.

 

Funeral service will be 2:00 p.m., Friday, August 9, 2019 at the Heavener First Baptist Church with Bro. Sam Dyer and Bro. Brock Hardin officiating. Burial will follow in Hontubby Cemetery under the direction of Dowden-Roberts Funeral Home of Heavener, Oklahoma.

 

 

Pallbearers will be: Tony Vaughn, Scott Robinson, David Hunt, Trace McDaniel, Claydin Boren, Willie Dehart, and Aaron Francis.

 

Viewing will be from 8:30 a.m. until 8:00 p.m., Wednesday and Thursday, and 8:30 a.m. until Noon, Friday.

 

The family will visit with friends from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., Thursday at the funeral home.

 

 

In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the Heavener First Baptist Church Hope Center or Gideon’s International.

 

To sign Mr. Dehart’s online guestbook please visit www.dowdenrobertsfuneralhome.com

 

 

 

Poteau city employee, Jerry Collins received his 40 years of service pin from Mayor Scotty White at the Poteau City Council meeting on Monday evening (August 5, 2019.)


The city council also accepted his retirement which was effective July 26, 2019.

 

Thank you, Jerry, for your many years of service to the city with the Refuse Department. 

 

A valued employee who will be missed.

 

Enjoy your retirement!

 

State Rep. Lundy Kiger (R-Poteau) met with water officials at the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality recently, presenting a list of complaints and pictures from Heavener residents who have received dirty water for many years.

 

Kiger shared two pages of complaints from people and business owners describing black to brown water coming out of the water lines into their homes and creating multiple issues. Issues range from not being able to drink or wash clothes to water not even coming out of the faucet at times. For instance, when the city’s Splash Pad is turned on, many residents and some businesses lose all water pressure.

 

“State law requires a minimum water pressure of at least 25 pounds constantly at each meter,” Kiger said. “In June, the city was without water for most of two business days causing restaurants, businesses and industries, to shut down. This causes lost production. They had to send their employees home and puts customer relations at risk.”

 

In addition to meeting with DEQ, Kiger has scheduled two additional public meetings on the water issue.

 

The first meeting is scheduled for noon Aug. 14 at the Donald W. Reynolds Center, 105 Reynolds Ave in Poteau.

 

Lunch will be provided. People wishing to attend should call the Poteau Chamber of Commerce at (918) 647-9178 to RSVP by the end of day on Friday, Aug 9.

 

The second meeting will be held at 11 a.m. Aug. 15 at the downtown Heavener Public Library, 203 E Ave. C in Heavener.

 

Both are to provide updates on where the city is on their plan and other related issues.

 

“The purpose of having a meeting in Poteau is to help make more people aware of this issue," Kiger said.

 

“It is our goal to inform individuals in the two-state region, as well as the economic development leaders in LeFlore County so they may to better understand the issues with Heavener’s water quality isn’t just a Heavener issue, but a regional issue that will affect us all.”

For example, OK Foods employs approximately 700 people with an annual payroll of about $21 million and pays approximately $400,000 annually in county property taxes, Kiger said. Other businesses include restaurants that employ numerous people in the community who all depend upon the businesses staying open so they can work and make a living, he said.

 

“Each time the water is bad or offline, businesses must close and send their employees home, resulting in neither earning the money they need to live,” Kiger said. “Water being too dirty or off too often has caused a loss in large contract agreements for some businesses. If our industries lose any more customers, they will be forced to find new contracts or shut down. The poultry processing plant gets their products from many small poultry farmers in the region who will be affected by this as well.”

 

Kiger held two Town Hall meetings previously and met with city leaders at the July City Council meeting, where he described the complaints from residents and explained that a third party looking into the water treatment facility and operations could be the fix needed to clean up the water quickly at very little expense.

 

Kiger told city leaders he realizes they didn’t create this problem, but now that they are in office it’s up to them to fix it. Kiger also told leaders he was here to help and didn’t care who gets this issue across the finish line.

 

“The bottom line is the citizens of Heavener must get clean and safe water in their community regardless,” he said. “My hope is that DEQ will get directly involved to help evaluate and determine what the city needs to do in providing clean and safe water for the city.”

Kiger said many residents have described to him how they have had to replace appliances that use water, including hot water tanks, washers and dish washers. Many have had to install expensive filtration systems and change the filters on an accelerated basis.

One industry is changing filters at a cost of over $9,000 per month just to try and improve the water coming from the city’s water plant for the water to meet their high federal standards, he said.

 

Kiger said there was an agreement with the city for a volunteer professional water technician to tour the water treatment facility at no cost to the city to conduct an evaluate. But, before the day arrived to tour the water treatment plant, the city pulled the plug on the agreement and said they would hire a different third party engineer to evaluate the operations of the plant.

 

Kiger told City Council members he doesn’t care who the third party engineer is as long as the findings are shared with the public for transparency. Kiger also told the Council it seems that local politics has gotten involved in decisions, and the Council needs to determine if a Council member has a conflict of interest with a relative working at the water treatment plant affecting decisions.

 

While making the presentation to DEQ, Kiger took samples of potable water from Heavener and raw water out of the Poteau River where Heavener draws its water to treat. The untreated river water was much cleaner than after being treated by the city, he said.

Kiger described to DEQ the conversations he’s had talking with water treatment professionals and engineers who have looked at the water and seen pictures of black water coming from city pipes. It appears the real problem may mostly lie with the water treatment facilities. Technicians may be over-using chemicals or not using enough chemicals at the right time. They also may not be adjusting for the changing conditions of the river and then overcompensating to try and rebalance the pH level, he said. This may be why on some days residents receive water that’s brown, purple, or black.

 

After the presentation, Kiger requested DEQ to become involved in trying to help the city of Heavener to determine what problems really exist in causing the water not to be consistently clean.

 

“There are days the water is clean, so this helps determine that the poor conditions of the water lines aren’t possibly the biggest reason the water is so discolored and unusable on many days,” Kiger said. “The city of Heavener is a beautiful city, and citizens deserve better for the water they are paying for and receiving. But, if the water issues aren’t resolved, Heavener won’t have to worry about trying to recruit new business, because no one will want to come there. City officials should jump at the chance for help from the state and understand the most important things are their citizens and the business and industries in their community.”

 

Press release

 


OKLAHOMA CITY – Attorney General Mike Hunter, along with North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein have sent a letter to Congressional leadership in both chambers, asking for the removal of federal barriers that are currently preventing health care providers from offering treatment for opioid use disorder.


Opioid use disorder is the physical and psychological reliance on opioids. Symptoms of opioid addiction include uncontrollable cravings for the drugs and the inability to control opioid use despite its negative impacts.


Attorney General Hunter said it’s estimated that 2 million Americans struggle with opioid use disorder.


“States are on the front lines and are combining all of the resources at our disposal to stop the current crisis,” Attorney General Hunter said. “Although we have been successful in many ways, there is more that can be done by the federal government. By eliminating the barriers outlined in our letter, Congress can take meaningful, productive steps that will benefit those currently struggling with addiction before it’s too late.


“I appreciate my attorneys general colleagues, including North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein, who acknowledge that addiction is a brain disease, not a moral failing, and the more help we can provide for those struggling the better.”


The letter outlines three areas that need to be addressed:
• Replace the cumbersome, out-of-date, privacy rules contained in 42 CFR Part 2 with the effective and more familiar privacy rules contained in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA);

• Pass HR 2482, the Mainstreaming Addiction Treatment Act, which would eliminate unnecessary burdens on buprenorphine prescribing imposed by the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000. Buprenorphine is one of three drugs used as part of Medication Assisted Treatment, the most effective treatment for opioid use disorder. Outdated and unnecessary federal requirements are discouraging doctors from prescribing this life-saving drug to patients who need it; and

• Fully repeal the Medicaid Institutions for Mental Diseases (IMD) exclusion. The IMD exclusion generally prohibits state Medicaid programs from receiving federal reimbursement for adults between 21 and 65 receiving mental health or substance use disorder treatment in a residential treatment facility with more than 16 beds.


“The opioid epidemic is tearing families apart all over our state and nation,” said Attorney General Stein. “Opioid addiction, like all chronic illnesses, requires treatment for people to get healthy. We must remove all unnecessary barriers between people with opioid use disorder and the treatment they need. I urge Congress to take these needed steps.”


Oklahoma and North Carolina is joined on the letter by attorneys general from Alaska, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia and Wisconsin.


Press release



TECUMSEH (Aug. 5, 2019) – Earthwork is underway marking the start of a building and renovation project by the Office of Juvenile Affairs (OJA) to modernize and consolidate Oklahoma’s secure-care treatment programs for juveniles.


The Next Generation Campus is being developed on the grounds of the Central Oklahoma Juvenile Center (COJC) in Tecumseh. Operations will continue at the juvenile center while construction is underway. The project, funded primarily by a $45 million bond issue, is expected to be completed in June 2021. Flintco is the building contractor and the DLR Group developed the architectural designs.


The project is part of a plan that includes consolidating OJA’s secure care facilities for juveniles in a modern campus to be built at COJC, which has buildings more than 100 years old. Last year, OJA closed its facility for females in Norman and moved those operations to Tecumseh. Males at Southwestern Oklahoma Juvenile Center in Manitou will be moved to Tecumseh when the new campus is completed. As part of the legislation authorizing the Tecumseh project, OJA is working with the governor and the Legislature to propose an alternative use for the Manitou campus.


The project consists of new construction while some existing buildings, like the gymnasium, will continue to be used. Buildings that will continue in use will receive modernization work.


The Next Generation campus will have a capacity of up to 144 beds. If in future years fewer beds are needed, the refurbished buildings will be renovated in such a way that they may be used in other capacities.


“The new campus will have a much more therapeutic environment,” said OJA Executive Director Steven Buck. “This modern campus will not only facilitate effective treatment for our residents, but will promote safety for our staff. This Next Generation Campus demonstrates our state's commitment to providing secure, juvenile justice services in a setting specifically built to facilitate rehabilitation for young people needing this level of care. The new campus is a better setting for our treatment programs such as trauma-informed care and evidence-based treatment curriculums.


“And by having one centralized facility, OJA will address technology inefficiencies, improve medical and treatment services, and save money in transportation and travel.”


The setting of the new campus will be small, home-like cottages with ample natural light. Research supports natural lighting as being extremely therapeutic.


The Next Generation Campus will feature individual rooms with high-ceiling day rooms full of natural colors. Each resident will have a bedroom with a window.


The units at COJC now are open-dorm style with very little natural lighting.


The new campus also will offer space and landscaping designed for walking and talking. The athletic fields also will be updated.


COJC is on 30 acres of a nearly 150-acre plat and has long been in need of an update.

 

The campus first opened in 1907 and has gone through many transformations over the years. Previously, it was known as the Russell Industrial School, Oklahoma State Industrial School for Incorrigible Girls, the State Industrial School for White Girls, Girls Town and the Central Oklahoma Juvenile Treatment Center.


At various times, it has housed orphans, children in need of mental health treatment, and youth adjudicated as delinquent and/or youthful offenders.

 

 

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