Lifestyles
Wednesday August 22, 2018

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OKW News | South East Oklahoma Latest News

  • EOMC Menu for August 21…

    Tuesday, August 21 - Taco Salad, Beef Tamales, Refried Beans, Spanish Rice, Fiesta Corn, Tomato Basil Soup.

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  • Great Food and Friendly…

    The Lumberjack Café in Howe serves up hearty helpings of delicious cuisine and an even bigger portion of friendliness.

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  • For the Children: History…

    By Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy CEO Joe Dorman

    As we at the Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy (OICA)…

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  • Free Breakfast and Lunch…

    Howe Public Schools is participating in a free breakfast and/or lunch program for the 2018-2019 school year.

    By…

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  • EOMC offers Telemed services…

    Eastern Oklahoma Medical Center is proud to offer Telemedicine to students, faculty & staff of both Howe and Poteau…

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  • Decorating Wisely: All about…

    By Glenda Wise

    I hope you have enjoyed Grayson’s columns the last few weeks. By the time you are reading this, she…

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  • Teen Drivers Can Pledge to…

    Press release

    OKLAHOMA CITY – As students head back to school this month, the Oklahoma Insurance Department (OID) is…

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  • Decorating Wisely : Movin on…

    By Grayson Wise

    Hello, my dear readers, it’s Grayson! We are talking about my dorm again since I have less than a week…

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  • World Breastfeeding Week…

    Press release

    The Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) is promoting World Breastfeeding Week Aug.1-7 with the…

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  • Decorating Wisely: PASTA

    By Grayson Wise

    Bonjour... again! I’m becoming quite the frequent guest writer, aren’t I? This week I wanted to…

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  • Application Information and…

    Press release

    As required by SQ 788, the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority has posted application information and…

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  • New Rule Protects 23K…

    Press release

    OKLAHOMA CITY - Oklahoma public housing residents will be protected from the dangers of secondhand…

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  • EOMC opens Walk In Clinic

    Press release

    When you have a medical issue, the last thing you need is a long wait at the doctor’s office or emergency…

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  • Dorm Sweet Dorm

    By Grayson Wise

    Bonjour, it’s me, Grayson! I’ve been given the honor of writing my mom’s article again, so let’s hope I…

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  • Software Vendor Selected for…

    Press release

    The Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority (OMMA), with assistance from the Office of Management and…

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Health & Wellness

By Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy CEO Joe Dorman

 

As we at the Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy (OICA) work to help reform and improve public policy, one of the most frustrating things we hear is the mistaken assumption that children cannot or should not try to change the world. Young people, some say, should “wait their turn” to speak out on social issues or take on a community leadership role.

 

While I agree that life experience is important, I would contend that passion, a willingness to learn, the and the ability to think with an open mind are equally as important. Often, these qualities are easier to find in children than adults, who can be closed-minded or unwilling to consider new information. I would also argue that some young people, even in their few years on this Earth, have had tremendous experiences that make them the most effective champions we need for positive change.

 

An example of such champions would be Clara Luper and the young Oklahomans she helped inspire to change the world. In 1958, segregation in Oklahoma was either custom or law at schools, parks, rest rooms, water fountains and restaurants. Sixty years ago this week, Clara and 13 young Oklahomans – ranging from 6 to 17 years old – began the Katz Drug Store sit-in in Oklahoma City, one of the first high-profile civil rights protests in the nation.

 

Luper and the thirteen children went into Katz Drug Store, took seats at a nearly empty lunch counter, and ordered hamburgers and Cokes. The waitress told them they would not be served. Instead of leaving, they stayed for hours in their seats, refusing to give them up to other customers.

 

They returned the next day. Finally, after three days, they were served at Katz.

 

From this event, protests grew to nearly every restaurant in downtown Oklahoma City and continued over the next four years. This effort, began by these children, helped to end segregation at every eating establishment in the city. This also helped spark the movement around the nation to tear down racial barriers.

 

As the Oklahoman reported 10 years ago, that sit-in began with a child asking a question: "I asked Momma why? Why didn't I just go in and ask for a Coca-Cola and a hamburger?” said Marilyn Luper Hildreth, now 70.

 

Her mother, Clara Luper, worked with the children in the spirit of nonviolent disobedience. As the Oklahoman wrote, “She taught them not to react when they were spat upon. She coached them how to lie down and protect themselves when they were hit. She instructed them to be polite, but forceful.”

 

We can certainly argue as a society that we are nowhere close to being where most would want us to be in terms of equality, but thankfully Clara Luper and thirteen children were brave enough to be the inspiration for the change which was long overdue. I hope this also encourages other young Oklahomans to stand for their principles and fight for what is right, while never letting someone discourage them simply because of their age.

 

About OICA
The Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy was established in 1983 by a group of citizens, to create a strong advocacy network that would provide a voice for the needs of children and youth in Oklahoma, particularly those in the state’s care and those growing up amid poverty, violence, abuse and neglect, disparities, or other situations that put their lives and future at risk.

Our mission statement: “Creating awareness, taking action and changing policy to improve the health, safety and well-being of Oklahoma’s children.“

 

Eastern Oklahoma Medical Center is proud to offer Telemedicine to students, faculty & staff of both Howe and Poteau Public Schools.

 

School based telehealth programs keep parents at work and kids in the classroom, a win-win for families and the community.

 

“The Telemed clinic is just one of the many goals at EOMC and we hope to have Telemed Clinics in all 17 schools in LeFlore county within a 5-year period,” said Amy Lomon, Marketing Director, for EOMC.

 

 

“Poteau and Howe are our test schools this year, and we are going live with this service for this school year.”

 

“I am excited about it, because there is not another hospital in the state offering this to its residents. Telemed has taken off in a big way in Texas, and it is also common in ER settings, but to have this technology at the schools where not only kids can be seen, but so can the faculty and staff of that school.”

 

 

The program should cut down on absences.

 

The Nurse Practitioner examines your child during school, with the assistance of the School Nurse, using video conferencing and medical equipment.

 

You’ve got enough to worry about at work. Save the travel time and days off it takes to take care of your sick child. The school nurse and our Nurse Practitioner will contact you regarding the care or treatment of your child.

 

Parents/Guardian must enroll students in the Telehealth program. This service does not replace your child’s regular primary care provider but provides convenient access to medical care when it is needed. If you are unable to get an immediate appointment and your child needs to be evaluated, EOMC wants to bridge that gap and keep your kids healthy and in the classroom.

 

howe

 

telemedschool

Friday, 10 August 2018 13:38

Teen Drivers Can Pledge to #JustDriveOK

Press release

 

OKLAHOMA CITY – As students head back to school this month, the Oklahoma Insurance Department (OID) is asking teen drivers to say no to distracted driving. The Department is launching the #JustDriveOK campaign next week.

 

“Distracted driving can have deadly consequences, but the solution to distracted driving is simple,” Oklahoma Insurance Commissioner John D. Doak said. “We are asking teen drivers to be aware of what takes their attention away from driving and make a conscious decision not to do those activities while behind the wheel.”

 

Distracted driving can include talking or texting on your phone, eating or drinking, talking to the people riding in the car, or messing with the car stereo, entertainment or navigation system. In Oklahoma, it is against the law to text and drive.

 

The #JustDriveOK campaign will ask students to pledge not to drive distracted. The OID is working with schools all over the state to spread the message.

 

The campaign kicks off Aug. 16 at the Union Gridiron Classic followed by the Jenks Trojan Preview on Aug. 17. #JustDriveOK representatives will be making appearances at football games and rallies all over the state throughout the season.

 

Students can take the pledge at justdrive.oid.ok.gov

 

Educators and parents can also find resources on the site like a teen driver contract and a list of apps to fight distracted driving.

 

 

About the Oklahoma Insurance Department
The Oklahoma Insurance Department, an agency of the State of Oklahoma, is responsible for the education and protection of the insurance-buying public and for oversight of the insurance industry in the state.

 

Press release


The Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) is promoting World Breastfeeding Week Aug.1-7 with the theme “Breastfeeding: Foundation of Life.” The theme focuses on the foundation of lifelong good health that breastfeeding provides for babies and mothers in a world filled with inequity, crisis and poverty.


Breastfeeding is the natural way of providing young infants with the nutrients they need for healthy growth and development. Virtually all mothers can breastfeed, provided they have accurate information and the support of their family, the health care system and society at large. We all have an important role to play in ensuring the growth, development and survival of children at home and around the world.


According to Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) data from 2016, 83.9 percent of Oklahoma mothers began breastfeeding their babies after birth. While most new mothers start out breastfeeding, many do not exclusively breastfeed for six months, or continue for up to one year of age or beyond as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).


“Breastfeeding establishes an important foundation for the health of the breastfed infant as well as the mother,” said Amanda Morgan, Breastfeeding Education Coordinator for the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Service. “WIC views breastfeeding as a priority and strives to set an example for community support of breastfeeding mothers.”


Data provided in The Oklahoma Toddler Survey (TOTS) from 2014 to 2016 indicate that although the numbers are gradually improving, only 41.5 percent of mothers were breastfeeding at six months and 23.5 percent of mothers were breastfeeding at 12 months or more. The aim of the national Healthy People 2020 breastfeeding objectives is to increase the proportion of infants who are breastfed at six months to nearly 61 percent and at one year to 34 percent.


For more information about breastfeeding, how to find a lactation consultant in your area, or how to become a Recognized Breastfeeding Friendly Worksite, visit the OSDH breastfeeding website http://bis.health.ok.gov, or call the Oklahoma Breastfeeding Hotline toll free at 1-877-271-MILK (6455).

 

Press release

 


As required by SQ 788, the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority has posted application information and instructions for patients and businesses interested in obtaining medical marijuana licenses.


The information is now available at OMMA.ok.gov. Per SQ 788, applications can be submitted on August 25. No application documents will be accepted by mail or in person. Only documents submitted online will be considered as part of a complete application.
“Our staff has worked nonstop over the past three months to develop this process and I commend their effort,” said Oklahoma State Department of Health Interim Commissioner Tom Bates. “The information provided today should answer many of the questions we have been receiving about what is required to apply.”


SQ 788 also established a Food Safety Standards Board and each appointment will be made by the Commissioner of Health, as specified in the new law. The nominees for the 12 positions will need to have expertise in the marijuana industry as well as public health and clinical science. Public announcement of the appointees will be made shortly following the special meeting of the Oklahoma State Board of Health next week.


“We have received a good list of candidates to be appointed,” said Commissioner Bates. “However, this is a new industry in our state, and we want to make sure the qualifications of each appointee are properly vetted.”


For questions about the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority or the application process, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Important Note: Information regarding applications reflects recent changes recommended by the Oklahoma Attorney General. All information is subject to change and is pending official adoption of emergency rules by the Oklahoma Board of Health and approval from the Governor. The Oklahoma State Department of Health will keep OMMA.ok.gov updated with the most current information.

Press release

 

OKLAHOMA CITY - Oklahoma public housing residents will be protected from the dangers of secondhand smoke through a new smokefree housing rule from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) that goes into effect on July 30.

 

“Secondhand smoke is a serious health threat, and can linger in rooms and even travel between homes in multi-unit housing. There is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke,” said Terri Bailey, executive director of the American Lung Association in Oklahoma.

 

The Lung Association celebrates this long-awaited health protection, following more than a decade of advocacy for the passage of the rule as well as support for the implementation of smokefree housing policies in local public housing authorities. In Oklahoma, it means protections for more than 23,000 residents in local public housing agencies.

 

“Everyone deserves the opportunity to lead a healthy life, and ensuring homes are free from the risks of secondhand smoke is a critical step for the health of residents,” said Bailey. “This is especially true for children and those who are more vulnerable to the impact of second smoke, such as those living with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Today we’re making a healthier future for Oklahoma and our country.”

 

In Oklahoma, the Lung Association is working closely with the Oklahoma State Department of Health to help public housing authorities implement smokefree housing policies while at the same time providing free smoking cessation support to residents. After the July 30 deadline, this work will be extended to include all Multi-Unit Housing properties. Additionally, the Lung Association is offering information on lung cancer screening to those who might qualify as part of the new Smokefree Public Housing Initiative, funded by the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation.


In November 2016, HUD announced a rule requiring all federally-owned public housing to become smokefree by July 30, 2018. This rule will protect close to two million Americans nationwide from being exposed to secondhand smoke in their homes, including 690,000 children.

 

Secondhand smoke exposure poses serious health threats to both children and adults. Damaging health effects in children and adults include lung cancer, respiratory infections, worsened asthma symptoms, heart attacks and stroke. For residents of multi-unit housing (e.g., apartment buildings and condominiums), secondhand smoke can be a major concern even if people don’t smoke in your unit, as smoke can migrate from other units and common areas and travel through doorways, cracks in walls, electrical lines, plumbing, and ventilation systems.

 

American Lung Association materials and success stories on smokefree housing are at Lung.org/smokefreehousing

 

american lung association

About the American Lung Association in Oklahoma
The American Lung Association in Oklahoma is the leading organization working to save lives by improving lung health and preventing lung disease, through research, education and advocacy. The work of the American Lung Association is focused on four strategic imperatives: to defeat lung cancer; to improve the air we breathe; to reduce the burden of lung disease on individuals and their families; and to eliminate tobacco use and tobacco-related diseases. For more information about the American Lung Association, a holder of the Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Guide Seal, or to support the work it does, call 1-800-LUNGUSA (1-800-586-4872) or visit: Lung.org

 

Tuesday, 24 July 2018 00:14

EOMC opens Walk In Clinic

Press release


When you have a medical issue, the last thing you need is a long wait at the doctor’s office or emergency room. You deserve quality medical care that fits your schedule.


Eastern Oklahoma Medical Center in Poteau is excited to announce their new Walk In Clinic opening August 1, 2018.


Open 7 days a week the new Walk In Clinic is located at Family Medical Clinic at 104 Wall Street in Poteau.


Hours are Monday- Friday 7:30am - 5:30pm


Saturday & Sunday 9:00am- 5:00 pm.

 

Eastern Oklahoma Medical Center is proud to provide our community with a Walk- In Clinic to fit the needs of the residents of LeFlore county and surrounding areas.


No appointments necessary, open 7 days a week. (Extended hours during sick seasons).


All payer sources accepted.

 

Got kids? No problem; we see them also!


The clinic is staffed by certified nurse practitioners committed to providing safe, high-quality care.

Press release


The Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority (OMMA), with assistance from the Office of Management and Enterprise Services (OMES), has selected Complia as the provider for compliance and licensing management software.


Using a statewide contract, the Denver-based company was selected through a review process that determined it was best equipped to meet OMMA’s specifications and time requirements. The passage of SQ788 tasks the Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) with having an application process in place by August 25 for patients, caregivers and businesses to apply for licenses and for the agency to collect application fees. OSDH created the OMMA to regulate the medical marijuana program.


Complia is a group of compliance officers and technologists with a background in cannabis licensing systems and government software.


“With this agreement in place, we are continuing our commitment to having the structure in place to meet all of the requirements of SQ788,” said OSDH Interim Commissioner Tom Bates. “We are deeply appreciative to OMES for providing their expertise in evaluating the vendor products and for helping select the right fit to implement the online application system.

 

They were able to accelerate the process in order for us to meet the challenging deadlines we face.”

By Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy CEO Joe Dorman

 

With the upcoming task force formed by Senate Bill 1517, I am confident Oklahoma has taken a major step forward in overcoming the high rate of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) that impacts our residents. For those of you not familiar with ACEs, this is the study of childhood trauma and the associated health-related conditions which follow into adulthood. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, childhood experiences, both positive and negative, have a tremendous impact on future violence victimization and perpetration as well as lifelong health and opportunity. As such, early experiences are an important public health issue. In Oklahoma, they are particularly relevant, as multiple research organizations have consistently ranked our state as having one of the highest rates of ACEs in the nation.

 

The study which discovered the links to childhood trauma and adult health was the CDC-Kaiser Permanente Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study, one of the largest investigations of childhood abuse and neglect and later-life health and well-being. The original ACE Study was conducted at Kaiser Permanente from 1995 to 1997 with two waves of data collection. Researchers pieced together the issues to document ten types of trauma – ranging from growing up in poverty to witnessing a parent or guardian abuse drugs or alcohol – which make up ACEs.

 

New research, which we expect the Oklahoma task force to examine, could offer ways not only to address child well-being but also to minimize destructive behavior found in adults. Per a recent article on the Aces Too High website, Dr. Daniel Sumrok, director of the Center for Addiction Sciences at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s College of Medicine, has developed a connection with addiction and ACEs. Sumrok, a family physician and former U.S. Army Green Beret who has served rural areas of Tennessee for the last 28 years, combines the latest science of addiction and applies it to his patients, most of whom are addicted to opioids — but also to alcohol, food, sex, gambling, and other such issues.

 

Sumrok says, “The solution to changing the illegal or unhealthy ritualized compulsive comfort-seeking behavior of opioid addiction is to address a person’s adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) individually and in group therapy; treat people with respect; provide medication assistance in the form of buprenorphine, an opioid used to treat opioid addiction; and help them find a ritualized compulsive comfort-seeking behavior that won’t kill them or put them in jail.”

If Sumork is correct, lawmakers may have another tool to help reduce the high rate of opioid addiction in Oklahoma. A report released last year by The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration says Oklahoma has the highest percentage of people who use prescription pain relievers for non-medical reasons.

 

Opioid abuse -- perhaps spurred by childhood trauma -- also contributes to the high rate of incarceration in our state. Oklahoma now has the highest incarceration rate in the U.S., according to a recent study by the Prison Policy Initiative. They released “States of Incarceration: The Global Context 2018” in May.

 

The nonprofit’s data figures account for state prisons, local jails, federal prisoners and other systems of confinement, the Tulsa World reported. Oklahoma’s incarceration rate is 1,079 per 100,000 people, unseating Louisiana at No. 1 in the country, according to the report. Louisiana has an incarceration rate of 1,052 per 100,000 people.

 

These issues will be a part of what the Oklahoma task force will review, and eventually use to help guide policy changes. The Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy looks forward to being a part of this process.

 

About OICA
The Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy was established in 1983 by a group of citizens, to create a strong advocacy network that would provide a voice for the needs of children and youth in Oklahoma, particularly those in the state’s care and those growing up amid poverty, violence, abuse and neglect, disparities, or other situations that put their lives and future at risk.

Our mission statement: “Creating awareness, taking action and changing policy to improve the health, safety and well-being of Oklahoma’s children.“

 

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