Lifestyles
Saturday January 19, 2019

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OKW News | South East Oklahoma Latest News

  • Injection Opioid Use…

    Press release

    A recent study indicates Oklahoma ranked second in the nation for prevalence of Hepatitis C (HCV).…

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  • Jalapeño Popper Casserole

    Serves 6-8

    Ingredients

    1 (32 oz.) bag frozen tater tots, thawed2 (8 oz.) packages cream cheese, softened2 cups…

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  • Linda Hoffman with Family…

    Linda Hoffman, APRN is ready to take care of you and your family's needs? Just some of the services that she offers at…

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  • Decorating Wisely: Authentic…

    By Glenda Wise

    It’s no secret that Grayson is all about all things European, particularly Parisian. She has…

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  • Sleep with ease at EOMC

    Poteau, OKLAHOMA - The sleep Center at Eastern Oklahoma Medical Center specializes in helping patients who may have…

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  • Tuesday Lunch at the Museum…

    Poteau, OKLAHOMA - Tuesday Lunch at the Museum will be January 15, 2019 from 11am until 1pm at the Hotel Lowrey.

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  • Mullin, Schrader Celebrate…

    Press release

    WASHINGTON—Congressmen Markwayne Mullin (R-OK-2) and Kurt Schrader (D-OR-5) celebrate a legislative…

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  • For the Children: Three Key…

    By Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy CEO Joe Dorman

    The 2019 Oklahoma Legislative Session is now less than one…

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  • EarthTalk® BITCON

    From the Editors of E - The Environmental Magazine

    Dear EarthTalk: How is it that bitcoin, a virtual currency that…

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  • Decorating Wisely: New Year

    By Glenda Wise

    Now that all the Christmas decorations are put away (ok, mine are still out, but, hey, we celebrate…

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  • EOMC offers Walk In Clinic, …

    If you are feeling a little under the weather right after the holidays.

    Eastern Oklahoma Medical can help.

    Try the…

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  • Living Wisely Column : Bread

    By Grayson Wise

    Hello friends! It is Grayson once again. I’m back from OU for the break.

    My first semester of…

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  • Going Smokefree in 2019: Free…

    Press release

    OKLAHOMA CITY – (December 27, 2018) – Today, the American Lung Association in Oklahoma announced free…

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  • EOMC offering Telemed to…

    Eastern Oklahoma Medical Center is proud to offer Telemedicine to students, faculty & staff of both Howe and Poteau…

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  • EOMC’s Walk In Clinic opens 7…

    If you are feeling a little under the weather right before the holidays.

    Eastern Oklahoma Medical can help.

    Try the…

    http://okwnews.com/images/ju_cached_images/50a04ccaa90670e2aab6f7c62277e5ae_110c69c05d0f40622bf42f92867a4eb7_90x70.resized.jpg
Health & Wellness

Press release


A recent study indicates Oklahoma ranked second in the nation for prevalence of Hepatitis C (HCV). Health officials believe significant contributing factors are injection drug use being seen in the state’s opioid epidemic.


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in collaboration with several universities, analyzed data gathered during a national survey conducted from 2013-2016 as well as other studies used to estimate the number of Americans living with HCV. There are approximately 2.4 million adults estimated to be living with HCV in the United States, with Oklahoma estimated to rank second at 1.82 per 100 population, behind only the District of Columbia at 2.34 per 100 population. In addition to this study, data collected by the Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) and other state public health officials indicate the number of new cases of HCV is on the rise. The CDC estimates more than 41,000 Americans were newly infected in 2016 alone.


A major contributing factor to the high occurrence of HCV is the sharing or re-using of needles when using injection drugs such as opioids. Opioid injection and HCV increased dramatically in younger Americans from 2004-2014. Among people aged 18-29, HCV increased by 400 percent, and admission for opioid injection by 622 percent. Those aged 30-39 saw an increase of HCV by 325 percent, and admission for opioid injection by 83 percent. It is important for those who use injection drugs to understand their increased risk of contracting HCV through shared needles.


“Far too many individuals are unaware of their risk of infection and importance to get tested,” said Kristen Eberly, director of the OSDH HIV/STD Service. “Although the ongoing opioid epidemic has contributed to recent increases in HCV infections among adults under age 40, it’s also important for Oklahomans to understand hepatitis C poses a serious health concern for people of all ages, including infants born to infected mothers.”


Baby boomers also account for a large portion of chronic HCV infections. Health officials recommend all adults born between 1945 and 1965 be tested at least once for HCV. Testing is also recommended for anyone who may be at risk of contracting the virus through injection drug use.


“The numbers are sobering, but this challenge can be tackled if the right steps are taken,” said Interim OSDH Commissioner Tom Bates. “We recognize that there is a cost to providing help, but even though it might be expensive, it is not hopeless. There is a 90 percent cure rate with treatment. We urge everyone at risk to get tested now.”


The cure rate is improving and reducing the length of treatment from a year to three months. However, the wholesale treatment cost for new cases ranges from $417 to $1,125 per day.
Hepatitis C is a blood-borne virus which can result in serious long-term health problems such as liver disease, liver failure, and even death. There is no vaccine to prevent the virus. The best way to prevent it is by avoiding behaviors known to spread the disease, especially injecting drugs. It can also be spread when getting tattoos or body piercings in unlicensed facilities with non-sterile instruments. The only way for a person to know if they have HCV is through a blood test from a health care provider.


For additional information, visit the OSDH HIV/STD website at hivstd.health.ok.gov

 

For assistance with finding local resources for opioid treatment, call 211.

 

Additional information about drug overdoses is available at poison.health.ok.gov

 


Linda Hoffman, APRN is ready to take care of you and your family's needs? Just some of the services that she offers at Family Medical Clinic in Heavener include:

 

• Walk in appointments
• Bilingual services
• DOT Physicals
• School Physicals
• LHI (Military) Physicals
• All age groups seen
• Lab services
• Flu Shots
• Well Child Checks

 

For an appointment call 918-653-2918.

 

Family Medical Clinic in Heavener office hours are Monday- Friday 8:00-5:00

Thursday, 10 January 2019 23:54

Sleep with ease at EOMC


Poteau, OKLAHOMA - The sleep Center at Eastern Oklahoma Medical Center specializes in helping patients who may have sleep disorders. The center is designed to be as comfortable as possible for patients who stay overnight so a sleep technician can monitor their sleep habits and record information for physicians to review for follow up treatment and recommendations.

 

Good sleep is important for good health. According to the National Sleep Foundation, 65% of Americans report that they do not get enough sleep (most adults need 6 to 8 hours). Sleep disorders are not just annoyances; they are serious health problems because they cause the oxygen content of the blood to drop to dangerously low levels, depriving the body and vital organs of oxygen.

 

These negative effects can lead to poor job productivity and are contributing factors in motor vehicle accidents, weight gain, heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure, colds and flu, just to name a few.

 

Why is good sleep so important?

Think of your body like a factory that performs several vital functions. As you drift off to sleep, your body begins its night-shift work:
* Healing damaged cells.
* Boosting your immune system.
* Recovering from the day’s activities.
* Recharging your heart and cardiovascular system for the next day.

 

The staff at EOMC know the value of sleeping well, and we’ve all experienced the feeling of being refreshed after a good night’s sleep-and the feeling of fatigue after a poor night’s sleep. But even though we know this, in our busy society, many of us are not getting the quality sleep needed to truly receive the health benefits of sleep.

 

The sleep Center at Eastern Oklahoma Medical Center specializes in helping patients who may have sleep disorders. The center is designed to be as comfortable as possible for patients who stay overnight so a sleep technician can monitor their sleep habits and record information for physicians to review for follow up treatment and recommendations.

 

Do you need a sleep study? Come and see the EOMC Difference.

 

Call for an important today (918)635-3593.

Press release


WASHINGTON—Congressmen Markwayne Mullin (R-OK-2) and Kurt Schrader (D-OR-5) celebrate a legislative victory as the Senate companion (S. 2278) to their bill (H.R. 5641), the State Offices of Rural Health Reauthorization Act of 2018, was signed into law late last year. The bill reauthorizes the State Offices of Rural Health grant program through 2022 and helps provide rural communities with vital resources to improve rural health care and increase access to quality, affordable care to individuals in rural communities.


“Americans in rural parts of our country routinely face difficulties accessing health care,” said Rep. Mullin (OK-2). “As a whole, rural America has far fewer doctors, specialists, and hospitals per population than in urban and suburban areas. The reauthorization of the State Offices of Rural Health grants allows this program to keep critical access hospitals open, training programs running, and most importantly, patients healthy. I am proud to work with Congressman Schrader to get a bill signed into law that improves the quality of life for rural Americans.”


“I am very pleased that our legislation to reauthorize the State Offices of Rural Health grant program was signed into law at the end of the year,” said Rep. Schrader (OR-5). “For our rural communities, state offices of rural health provide vital services to areas that often have limited resources and access to health services. In Oregon, our Office of Rural Health worked to develop recruitment and retention programs to attract health care professionals to our underserved areas. It has also connected our small rural health systems with state and federal resources, while providing technical support for our rural health care delivery systems. Our bipartisan bill expands these crucial services that ensure our rural communities have access to affordable, quality health care.”


"The passage of State Offices of Rural Health Reauthorization bill is an important step to ensure the support for rural hospitals, clinics and health care practitioners,” said Teryl Eisinger, Executive Director of the National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health. “State Offices of Rural Health are anchors of information and technical assistance for rural health improvement and we are thrilled by Rep. Mullin and Rep. Schrader’s work to get this signed into law."


Established in 1991, Oklahoma State University’s Office of Rural Health was created as part of a federal mandate to coordinate, plan, and promote quality health care for underserved rural Oklahomans. The Office of Rural Health works with rural communities to help ensure their health care infrastructure is economically viable and to broaden and improve the access and quality of health care services.


Established in 1979, the Oregon Office of Rural Health was created to improve the accessibility of quality health care for underserved rural Oregonians. The Office of Rural Health works with rural communities to help ensure their health care infrastructure is economically viable and to broaden and improve the access and quality of health care services.


Congressmen Mullin and Schrader introduced H.R. 5641 on April 26, 2018. The bill was signed into law by President Trump on December 31, 2018.



 

By Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy CEO Joe Dorman

 

The 2019 Oklahoma Legislative Session is now less than one month from convening and conducting official business. We at the Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy (OICA) are anxious to see the long list of fresh ideas submitted by lawmakers. We have been monitoring much of the progress and feel there are great opportunities ahead with these new legislators and a new governor.

 

Three subjects of interest that we are working on are:

1. Trauma Informed Care and the Reduction of Adverse Childhood Experiences: In 2018, we worked with lawmakers and Gov. Mary Fallin to create the Trauma Informed Care Task Force, which looks at ways to help reduce the impact of traumatic experiences suffered by children. In the coming year, this task force will be fully operational and be comprised of six additional lawmakers and two appointees from Gov. Kevin Stitt. The inclusion of lawmakers is especially important, as we hope the taskforce provides these members with policy suggestions that can directly influence legislation. The task force will begin work in February and will hold regular gatherings to explore why Oklahoma has such a large number of children suffering toxic long-term trauma and what can be done to reduce that harmful phenomenon.

 

2. School Suspensions: As there was in 2018, we expect another healthy discussion regarding school suspensions as an appropriate disciplinary measure. Our position is that, while punishing children for disruptive behavior is an important part of the learning process, banishing a student from the classroom for days or even weeks can have an obviously counter-productive effect. Children serving lengthy suspensions often fall behind in their classwork. Meanwhile, the cause of bad or disruptive behavior – which is often rooted in difficult circumstances at home – goes unaddressed. For that reason, OICA will again oppose legislation making it easier to suspend children from school or that lowers the age for permissible suspensions (one lawmaker is reportedly working to allow suspensions of preschool students). Instead, we will work to support policies that encourage intervention and counseling prior to any suspension.

 

3. Child-Endangerment and “Failure to Protect” Laws: It should go without saying that OICA believes that any situation in which an adult is knowingly endangering a child is unacceptable. With that said, OICA is awaiting language regarding a potential law that will impact how the court will treat an adult who allows a child to be endangered and the actual perpetrator of the harm done. We do not want to see lopsided justice where a child-abuser receives a lesser sentence than an adult who fails to report that abuse. At the same time, we also want to ensure that justice for children is never overlooked and their rights are always respected. We hope these laws are reviewed and, moving forward, administered properly.

 

OICA will be involved and report on these issues to you as they come forward. If you would like to receive our weekly newsletter or action alerts please sign up at oica.org to stay informed.

 

 

Sunday, 06 January 2019 03:03

EarthTalk® BITCON


From the Editors of E - The Environmental Magazine

 

Dear EarthTalk: How is it that bitcoin, a virtual currency that few of us have heard of and no one I know uses, is becoming a major contributor to carbon emissions?

– Troy Sussman, Bowie, MD

 

It’s hard to believe that bitcoin, the best known of a group of new “cryptocurrencies” that many believe to be the future of money, could be the final nail in the coffin causing irreversible climate change. But a recent study from University of Hawai’i at Manoa researchers found that “projected bitcoin usage, if it follows the rate of adoption of other broadly adopted technologies, could alone produce enough carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to push warming above 2°C within less than three decades.” According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), we can only hope to avoid the most cataclysmic effects of global warming if we can limit the rise in average global temperature to 2°C.

 

The reason bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies generate so much CO2 is that they require massive amounts of electricity, and our grid is still supplied primarily by fossil fuels. Bitcoin transactions are recorded and processed by dispersed individuals known as “miners” who group them together in blocks and add them to larger “chains” which serve as public ledgers of transactions.

 

“The verification process by miners, who compete to decipher a computationally demanding proof-of-work in exchange for bitcoins, requires large amounts of electricity,” reports study co-author Randi Rollins. Rollins estimates that bitcoin transactions accounted for some 69 million metric tons of CO2 emission in 2017 alone—and expects bitcoin-related emissions to rise sharply in the near future as the payment technology is adopted by millions around the world. If society adopts bitcoin as quickly as it adopted previous wildly popular “technologies” (e.g. credit cards, dishwashers), increased electricity demands could overwhelm efforts to curtail greenhouse gas emissions.

 

“We cannot predict the future of Bitcoin, but if implemented at a rate even close to the slowest pace at which other technologies have been incorporated, it will spell very bad news for climate change and the people and species impacted by it,” says the study’s lead author Camilo Mora.

 

“With the ever-growing devastation created by hazardous climate conditions, humanity is coming to terms with the fact that climate change is as real and personal as it can be,” she adds. “Clearly, any further development of cryptocurrencies should critically aim to reduce electricity demand, if the potentially devastating consequences of 2°C of global warming are to be avoided.”

 

Critics of the report counter that the global electric power sector—not to mention computers and cryptocurrency “rigs”—are getting significantly more energy efficient every year. Also, bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies might not be as widely adopted as researchers assume. But isn’t it better we know now about the potential climate risks of bitcoin so we can work to direct the technology’s development in as environmentally friendly a way as possible? It certainly would be a shame to suffer the effects of runaway climate change after doing so much to lower our carbon footprints just because we neglected to hold cryptocurrencies to the same efficiency standards as the rest of the technologies we rely on.

 

CONTACTS: Bitcoin, bitcoin.org; “Bitcoin emissions alone could push global warming above 2°C,” Nature Climate Change, https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-018-0321-8.

EarthTalk® is produced by Roddy Scheer & Doug Moss for the 501(c)3 nonprofit EarthTalk.

 

To donate, visit www.earthtalk.org. Send questions to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

earthtalk

 


If you are feeling a little under the weather right after the holidays.


Eastern Oklahoma Medical can help.


Try the Walk In Clinic at the Family Medical Clinic.


The clinic is located at 104 Wall Street (across from the hospital).


Their phone number is: 918-635-3576.

 

Open 7 days a week

 

Monday - Friday - 7:30am-5:30pm


Saturday & Sunday - 9:00am-5:00pm

Press release

 

OKLAHOMA CITY – (December 27, 2018) – Today, the American Lung Association in Oklahoma announced free resources to help residents who are ready to quit using tobacco as a part of their New Year’s resolution.

 

According to the Lung Association’s 2018 State of Tobacco Control report, more than 19 percent of adults smoke in Oklahoma, which is attributed to 7,490 deaths per year in the state. Unfortunately, not everyone has benefited equally from tobacco control efforts, and as a result the smoking rate is much higher for lower income and some minority communities. In fact, 33.6 percent of adults living in public housing smoke and more than 20 percent of African-American adults report that they currently use tobacco.

“While the smoking rate is decreasing in our state, not all communities are seeing the same progress and lifesaving benefits of quitting smoking,” said Terri Bailey, executive director for the Lung Association. “That’s why we offer special programs throughout the city to help people quit. The New Year is the perfect time for people to commit to a smokefree life and we are here to help.”

 

The Lung Association offers several free programs and resources to help Oklahomans quit smoking:

 

• Smoking Cessation Initiative: Through the Smoking Cessation for Low Income Housing Residents Initiative, the Lung Association works with Public Housing Agencies and other local partners to provide free resources for people who are ready to quit. The residents are given free access to the Freedom From Smoking program, a proven-effective smoking cessation program that has helped hundreds of thousands of people quit tobacco. This program is funded by the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation. For more information, call 1-800-LUNGUSA.

 

• Lung HelpLine: The Lung HelpLine is a free telephonic tobacco cessation resource staffed by Certified Tobacco Cessation Specialists, some of which are also respiratory therapists, registered nurses and even pharmacists. Along with counseling, the HelpLine offers up to six weeks of free nicotine replacement therapy (such as nicotine patches) to people who are medically eligible. Resources are available online at Lung.org or over the phone at 1-800-LUNGUSA.

 

“Nicotine in cigarettes and e-cigarettes are highly addictive, which is part of why it can be so tough to quit smoking. On average, it takes a tobacco user eight to 11 quit attempts before they are smokefree,” said Bailey. “This is why it is so important to turn to proven methods and expert resources to help you quit smoking for good.”



About the American Lung Association
The American Lung Association is the leading organization working to save lives by improving lung health and preventing lung disease, through research, education and advocacy. The work of the American Lung Association is focused on four strategic imperatives: to defeat lung cancer; to improve the air we breathe; to reduce the burden of lung disease on individuals and their families; and to eliminate tobacco use and tobacco-related diseases. For more information about the American Lung Association, a holder of the Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Guide Seal, or to support the work it does, call 1-800-LUNGUSA (1-800-586-4872) or visit: Lung.org

Tuesday, 25 December 2018 23:07

EOMC offering Telemed to students

Eastern Oklahoma Medical Center is proud to offer Telemedicine to students, faculty & staff of both Howe and Poteau Public Schools.

 

School based telehealth programs keep parents at work and kids in the classroom, a win-win for families and the community.

 

“The Telemed clinic is just one of the many goals at EOMC and we hope to have Telemed Clinics in all 17 schools in LeFlore county within a 5-year period,” said Amy Lomon, Marketing Director, for EOMC.

 

“Poteau and Howe are our test schools this year, and we are going live with this service for this school year.”

 

“I am excited about it, because there is not another hospital in the state offering this to its residents. Telemed has taken off in a big way in Texas, and it is also common in ER settings, but to have this technology at the schools where not only kids can be seen, but so can the faculty and staff of that school.”

 

The program should cut down on absences.

 

The Nurse Practitioner examines your child during school, with the assistance of the School Nurse, using video conferencing and medical equipment.

 

You’ve got enough to worry about at work. Save the travel time and days off it takes to take care of your sick child. The school nurse and our Nurse Practitioner will contact you regarding the care or treatment of your child.

 

Parents/Guardian must enroll students in the Telehealth program. This service does not replace your child’s regular primary care provider but provides convenient access to medical care when it is needed.

 

If you are unable to get an immediate appointment and your child needs to be evaluated, EOMC wants to bridge that gap and keep your kids healthy and in the classroom.

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