Saturday September 23, 2017

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Whatzup Outdoors

Whatzup Outdoors (202)

A service of the Oklahoma Wildlife Department

Opening day for many archery hunting opportunities will be Oct. 1. Those planning to hunt are reminded to make sure they are up-to-date on licenses and hunter education requirements, and are familiar with all rules and regulations including field tagging, E-Check and legal equipment.


Deer Archery Season: Oct. 1 to Jan. 15, 2018


Last year, hunters set a harvest record for deer archery season, reporting 26,151 animals taken. And this year holds promise to be another banner year.


The state saw rainy conditions during spring and early summer, which benefited wildlife, food sources and vegetation. With the healthy vegetation this year, the deer could be more difficult to spot. Hunters as always are encouraged to scout before heading out to take advantage of deer movement patterns.


Oklahoma has one of the more liberal season bag limits nationwide for archery deer hunters, allowing six deer (only two of which may be bucks). All deer taken during archery season count toward a hunter’s combined season bag limit, and hunters must always field tag and report their harvest using the online E-Check system.


And since turkey archery season is open too, it is common for many deer hunters to buy and carry a turkey license into the woods in case they get the chance to harvest a bird.


Elk Archery Season-Private Lands: Oct. 1 to Jan. 15, 2018* (Except Special SW Zone)


Archers pursuing elk on private lands need to be aware of the seven elk-hunting zones in Oklahoma and the regulations for each of them. Elk hunting is not permitted on any Department-managed public land except through the Controlled Hunts program.


Last year, archers took 51 elk from private lands in 12 counties. The combined season limit is two elk of either sex.


*Each zone has a specified number of elk that can be taken, and when that number is met, the zone will close to all elk hunting. All elk hunters must check wildlifedepartment.com before hunting to ensure the zone is still open for hunting. In the Special Southwest Zone (Caddo, Comanche and Kiowa counties), archery elk season runs from Oct. 7-11 and Dec. 9-13 and there is no zone quota for number of elk harvested. Elk hunters must have written landowner permission.


Turkey Archery Season: Oct. 1 to Jan. 15, 2018


Turkey hunters may hunt statewide and are limited to one bird whether taken with archery or firearms. Hunter orange requirements apply for certain dates during the fall season, which are listed in the current Oklahoma Hunting and Fishing Guide. And all harvests must be reported online using the E-Check system. If hunting Jan. 1 or after, turkey hunters must possess the current year licenses, which will still be valid the next fall season if unfilled this season.


Pronghorn Archery Season: Oct. 1 to Oct. 14


The only open areas are Cimarron County and the part of Texas County west of State Highway 136. Written landowner permission is required, and hunter orange rules apply on certain dates. The archery limit is two animals, only one of which may be a buck. All pronghorn must be field-tagged and taken to the physical check station listed in the regulations guide.


Scouting and visiting with landowners are keys to pronghorn hunting success. Last year, archery hunters took 31 pronghorns, nearly double the number from the previous year. This indicates the pronghorn population is returning to good health after several years of drought in the Panhandle.


Black Bear Archery Season: Oct. 1 to Oct. 15


Last season, 53 bears were taken with archery equipment on public and private lands in Latimer, Le Flore, McCurtain and Pushmataha counties (the only areas where bear hunting is permitted). Even though baiting is prohibited on public lands, about one-fourth of the annual archery harvest usually comes from public lands.


Bear hunters must buy their license before the first day of the season; licenses will not be sold after the season starts. Hunters may harvest one bear combined for all seasons.


A good strategy is to locate a tree with falling acorns along with signs of bear activity. Bears tend to feed anytime of day during the fall, so the more-patient hunters are often rewarded. All bears must be field-tagged and immediately reported via phone to a number listed in the regulations guide.

One change in big game regulations this year is the ability to use leashed tracking dogs to help find downed game. Trackers must notify a game warden beforehand, and no trackers may possess any means of take while tracking.
Also opening Oct. 1 is rabbit season, which will run through March 15, 2018. Hunters must follow the hunter orange rules when afield during any big game firearms hunting season.


Seasons on public lands may vary from statewide season dates. Complete details and regulations for each season can be found in the current "Oklahoma Hunting and Fishing Guide," available in the Wildlife Department’s free phone application, online at wildlifedepartment.com, or in print anywhere hunting licenses are sold.


To learn more about archery hunting in Oklahoma, go online to wildlifedepartment.com

 

 

A service of the Oklahoma Wildlife Department



It only happens once a year, and if you enjoy nature, the outdoors, hunting and fishing, you surely won’t want to miss it. It’s the wildly popular Wildlife Expo, coming this weekend, Sept. 23-24. The Lazy E Arena south of Guthrie will again be bustling indoors and outdoors with fun, friends, food and families as the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation presents the 12th edition of the state’s largest outdoor recreation event.
“The Expo has something for everyone in the family, especially the youngsters,” said Rhonda Hurst, Wildlife Expo coordinator. “There are so many things to do and see, I would recommend that families plan to spend the whole day to see and do everything available.”


While the grown-ups will find plenty of interesting things to enjoy, the youngsters are sure to have a blast trying out the dozens of hands-on activities that are designed to give everyone a small taste of recreational opportunities that are available in Oklahoma’s outdoors.


Among the more popular stops for the kids is the shotgun range, where visitors who satisfy the height requirement are able to shoot at flying clay targets. Each year at Expo, hundreds of kids experience for the first time the thrill of firing a shotgun.


Who doesn’t like fishing? At Expo, the entire family can attend a fishing how-to clinic and then actually try their luck in the pond stocked with hungry fish! Then these new anglers can visit a nearby booth where they can learn how to clean fish.


Other youth-oriented activities will return, including the rock-climbing wall, the Expo’s newest attraction. Other fun things the kids can do include:


• Archery and bowfishing.
• Pellet gun and BB gun shooting.
• Mountain biking.
• Laser Shot game.
• Casting Kids.
• Fishing simulator.
• Insect Adventure petting zoo.
• Goose-knocking.
• ATV rides.


Between all the activities, take a stroll through the educational booths, where parents and kids can see and learn about topics including Texas horned lizards, furbearers, bird identification, Oklahoma’s sportfish, reptiles and amphibians, falconry and honeybees in a hive.


When it’s time for a snack, there’s not much better than a visit to the Camp Cookin’ in the Heartland exhibit, where Dutch oven cooking is the focus, and visitors can sample something sweet or savory. If you are inside the arena, stop by the Taste of the Wild area and try a bite of venison sausage, fried fish and bison chili.


More than 100 attractions are scattered outdoors throughout the grounds and at booths inside the arena. You’ll cover a lot of ground, so wear your comfortable walking shoes and weather-appropriate clothing, and get ready to find something that catches your attention around every corner!


And for Mom and Dad, one of the best things about the Wildlife Expo is that parking, admission and activities are all free!


The Wildlife Department produces the Wildlife Expo with a range of organizations, individuals and other state agencies, along with hundreds of volunteers to help the event run smoothly. Major sponsors include P&K Equipment, Terry’s Taxidermy, Ralph’s Packing Co., Oklahoma Station Chapter Safari Club International and Sportsman’s Alliance Foundation.


Wildlife Expo hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 23, and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 24. Busloads of students will visit Sept. 22 for School Day. Admission, activities and parking are free. Make plans now to be part of the fun!


For more information, including directions to the Lazy E Arena, go online to www.wildlifedepartment.com and open the “Wildlife Expo” link.

By Teresa Black Bradway

 

A Texas rock band joins the Bigfoot music festival announced by Artie Carnes, director of the Kiamichi Mountain Christian Mission.


The Bigfoot Festival and Conference is set Oct. 6 and 7 on the Mission ground (Christ’s 40 Acres), at Highway 144 and Indian Highway, Honobia.


The Clayton High School Band plays at 11 am Friday Oct. 6.


The Shane Bell Band is new to the festival. An eclectic group of musicians and songwriters from Arlington, Texas, they play original and cover songs.


Their style is a cross between: ZZ Top, Foo Fighters, Adele, and the Killdares. Shane Bell’s vocals and guitar blend with vocals and a beautifully mellow viola played by Shanna Shelton, lead and slide guitar by Larry Stephens, bass and vocals by Paul Fuller, and Kolaso Gilmore on drums.


Each year fans enjoy free family-friendly Branson-style sound – bluegrass, country, gospel and comedy – on the indoor stage at the Mission campground.


The band MX3, headed by Artie Carnes, will perform. It is well-known as it was formerly the Little River Band from Honobia, which headlined previous Big Foot festivals.


“The Texans” are returning, with a show that is more than a gospel concert -- it is inspiration, laughter and fun.


This band is a full-time family trio spreading the good news of Christ through music. “The Texans” lived and performed in Branson, Mo. shows, a dinner theatre in Eureka Springs, Ak. and give hundreds of shows a year when traveling.


The song, “Bigfoot! Legend of the Mountains” will be heard. It can be downloaded at Cdbaby.com. Proceeds go to the Bigfoot Scholarship Fund.


A conference Oct. 6 and 7 features Bigfoot researchers who will discuss Bigfoot reports and evidence. Information on the festival is at www.honobiabigfoot.com


A special children’s area will be offered. There will be a 5K Run and walk sponsored by Choctaw Nation, camping, helicopter rides, face painting, an art contest, the Battiest Archer Booth, and campfire storytelling.


A church service is held on Sunday and all are invited.


The Honobia Bigfoot Organization, a non-profit group, partners with the Chahta Foundation to give scholarships to area high school graduates.

 

 

A service of the Oklahoma Wildlife Department

 

McGee Creek: September 10. Elevation normal, water 83 and clear. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush structure. Largemouth and spotted bass slow on plastic baits around brush structure, points, rocks and standing timber. Channel and flathead catfish fair on sunfish along riprap and standing timber. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County.

Pine Creek: September 10. Elevation dropping, water clear. Largemouth bass fair on topwater lures in the main lake. Crappie slow on minnows and jigs around brush structure and channels. Channel catfish good on chicken liver and cut bait in the main lake. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

Robert S. Kerr: September 10. Elevation normal, water murky. Blue, channel and flathead catfish good on cut bait, live shad, shad and stinkbait along channels, flats and points. Largemouth and spotted bass fair on crankbaits and plastic baits around points and riprap. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush structure and rocks. Report submitted by Allen Couch, game warden stationed in Haskell County.

Sardis: September 10. Elevation normal, water 81 and clear. Largemouth and spotted bass fair on buzz baits, jigs, plastic baits and spinnerbaits around brush structure, standing timber and weed beds. Blue, channel and flathead catfish fair on cut bait, live bait, shad and sunfish in the main lake and along shorelines. Crappie fair on hair jigs, jigs, minnows and tube jigs around brush structure and standing timber. Report submitted by Dane Polk, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County.

Texoma: September 11. Elevation normal, water clearing. Striped bass good on flukes, hair jigs and live shad below the dam, in the main lake, around points and riprap. Blue catfish good on chicken liver, cut bait and shad below the dam, in the main lake, around points, riprap and river mouth. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush structure, the main lake and standing timber. Report submitted by Cody Jones, game warden stationed in Bryan County.

Wister: September 10. Elevation above normal, water 80 and stained. Largemouth bass fair on buzz baits, jigs and plastic baits around brush structure, the main lake and river channel. Blue and channel catfish fair on cut bait in the main lake. Crappie fair on minnows and tube jigs around brush structure and in the main lake. Report submitted by James Williams, game warden stationed in LeFlore County.

By Teresa Black Bradway

 

Serious Bigfoot seekers can look for Sasquatch even when the annual Bigfoot festival is over, and an Oklahoma business will help them.


The Honobia Bigfoot Festival and Conference is set Oct. 6 and 7 at Kiamichi Mountains Christian Mission (Christ 40 acres) at Highway 144 and Indian Highway, Honobia, OK.


But some need more than this annual Bigfoot fix. They will head deep into Oklahoma woods to explore what fans call, “One of the greatest mysteries in history.”


“Every year, people from all over the US come to get their once-in-a- lifetime experience here within the Kiamichi Mountains,” said Troy Hudson of Kiamichi Mountain Adventures. “They come to southeast Oklahoma hoping to catch a glimpse of the most elusive folklore legend of all time.”


Hudson takes visitors into a 100 acre wilderness area in the Kiamichi Mountains to seek the legendary creature. Some report remarkable sightings which may be evidence of Bigfoot. His tours have included people from across the US, Canada, Sweden and England.


“The majority of our events happen after dark,” Hudson said. “We do have day hikes and some educational field demonstrations on how and what to look for.”


In March, six women from east Texas and Louisiana enjoyed an unscheduled Bigfoot tour and sightings.


“They were on their own Sasquatch expedition,” Hudson said. They rented a cabin near Smithville east of Honobia to celebrate a birthday and were told that someone at Honobia gave tours. The women located Hudson, who told them to return that night.


“Through the evening, several ladies observed extremely large man-like shadows on top of the ridge walking back and forth,” Hudson said. “Several others observed similar shadows near the base camp rocking back and forth between the trees.”


. “One young lady got the rare opportunity to watch a small child-like figure along with a larger figure move about just 50 yards from her for little over 10 minutes,” Hudson said. “She described that she at one moment could see a light-colored area of its face on the small figure. She said that it was so fast that all she could see was bridge of a nose and both eyes. She was so amazed she couldn't stop talking about it.”


Everyone in the group saw “eye shine,” near their base camp, he said.


Not everyone catches sight of something, Hutson said, but many do.


“More than half of the people who attended have their own experiences that leave them wanting more,” Hudson said.


“A lot of people come to learn,” about Bigfoot, Hudson said, “to try and get a glimpse which a lot do. Some see one or two, and many leave with a lot more than they expected.”


Hudson offers field expeditions in the fall, early winter and spring, usually for two days and two nights. Two or three experienced members of the Bigfoot conference staff may serve as guides. For more information contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Fees vary with the length of the trip.


Hudson, of Coalgate, Ok., has led Bigfoot expeditions in the Kiamichi Mountains for over ten years. Hudson.heads safety and security for the Kiamichi Mountains Christian Mission and the Bigfoot festival, which attracts an estimated four thousand people. He is on the board of directors for the Honobia Bigfoot Organization.


His Adventures business is separate from the Honobia Bigfoot Organization, a nonprofit which raises funds for scholarships for local students.


The festival runs Friday and Saturday, Oct. 6 and 7. A two-day conference opens at 10 am Friday, October 6th . Farlan Huff, M.K Davis of Mississippi, Dr. Jeff Meldrum, Idaho State University and Dr. Samuel Webb Sentell, of Louisiana will speak. Tickets to the conference are sold daily.


After dark, visitors gather around a campfire to tell of their encounters with Bigfoot. Many camp nearby.


There is a 5K Run sponsored by the Choctaw Nation, a free music festival, helicopter rides, a children’s area, an art contest, the Battiest Archer Booth, face painting and a street entertainer who juggles and makes balloon animals.
A church service is held on Sunday and all are invited to attend.


More information is at www.honobiabigfoot.com

 

hudson

Troy Hudson speaks about sightings of Bigfoot reported in Oklahoma.

 

 

hudson guide

 Troy Hudson, right, guides visitors from the Oklahoma City area on a Bigfoot expedition in the Kiamichi Mountains near Honobia.

 

 

 

A Service of the Oklahoma Wildlife Department

 

Blue River: September 5. Elevation normal, water 72 and clear. Smallmouth, largemouth and spotted bass good on crankbaits and topwater lures around brush structure and rocks. Channel catfish excellent on chicken liver and stinkbait around brush structure, flats, rocks and near current in large pools. Report submitted by Matt Gamble, biologist at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

 

Broken Bow: September 3. Elevation normal, water 83. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass fair on crankbaits and plastic baits around brush structure, points and standing timber. Channel catfish fair on chicken liver, cut bait and punch bait along channels, in coves and around points. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

 

Eufaula: September 3. Elevation normal, water turbid. Blue catfish good on chicken liver, cut bait and live shad below the dam, in the main lake and along rocks. Largemouth bass good on jerk baits, small lures and red-eyed rattletraps around brush structure, in coves and along shorelines. Crappie good on minnows and jigs around brush structure and docks. Report submitted by Cannon Harrison, game warden stationed in McIntosh County.

 

Hugo: September 3. Elevation normal, water 80. Clue and flathead catfish fair on shad below the dam. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs along the river channel and standing timber. Largemouth and spotted bass being caught along plastic baits and topwater lures around brush structure and points. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw County.

 

Konawa: September 4. Elevation normal, water 86 and clear. Largemouth bass fair on Alabama rigs, crankbaits, jigs, plastic baits and topwater lures in the main lake, around points, river channel and weed beds. Striped bass hybrids and white bass good on crankbaits, shad and spoons in coves, the inlet and main lake. Channel catfish fair on chicken liver, cut bait and dough bait in coves, the main lake and riprap. Report submitted by Garret Harley, game warden stationed in Seminole County.

 

Lower Mountain Fork: September 3. Elevation normal, water clear. Trout fair on small lures, tube jigs and worms along creek channels, rocks and shallows. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

 

McGee Creek: September 3. Elevation normal, water 83 and clear. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush structure. Largemouth and spotted bass slow on plastic baits in the main lake, around standing timber and submerged humps. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County.

 

Pine Creek: September 3. Elevation above normal, water clear. Largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and topwater lures in coves and points. Crappie slow on minnows and jigs around brush structure and the main lake. Channel catfish fair on chicken liver and cut bait in the main lake and river channel. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

 

Robert S. Kerr: September 3. Elevation normal, water clear. Largemouth bass good on crankbaits, jigs and plastic baits around brush structure and creek channels. Crappie good on minnows around bridges in Big Sans Bois Creek. Channel catfish fair on shad below the dam and along flats. Report submitted by J. D. Stauffer, game warden stationed in Haskell County.

 

Sardis: September 1. Elevation above normal, water 83. Largemouth and spotted bass slow on bill baits, crankbaits, plastic baits, spinnerbaits and topwater lures around brush structure, points, rocks, standing timber and weed beds. Crappie slow on hair jigs, minnows and tube jigs around brush structure and standing timber. Report submitted by Dane Polk, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County.

 

Texoma: September 3. Elevation above normal, water clearing. Striped bass good on flukes, hair jigs and shad below the dam, in coves, along riprap and spillway. Blue catfish good on chicken liver, cut bait and shad below the dam, in the main lake, around points, riprap and river mouth. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush structure, the main lake and standing timber. Report submitted by Cody Jones, game warden stationed in Bryan County.

 

Wister: September 3. Elevation above normal, water 85 and stained. Largemouth bass fair on buzz baits, jigs and spinnerbaits around brush structure and the main lake. Blue and channel catfish fair on cut bait and punch bait along flats and the main lake. Crappie slow on minnows and tube jigs around brush structure, creek channels, main lake and river channel. Report submitted by James Williams, game warden stationed in LeFlore County.

A service of the Oklahoma Wildlife Department

Arbuckle: August 19. Elevation below normal, water 81 and stained. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass fair on flukes, jigs and plastic baits around brush structure, the main lake and along riprap. Crappie slow on minnows and jigs around brush structure and docks. White bass slow on lipless baits and roadrunners in white/chartreuse in the main lake. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

Broken Bow: August 20. Elevation below normal, water 88. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass fair on crankbaits and plastic baits around brush structure, points and standing timber. Channel, blue and flathead catfish fair on chicken liver, cut bait, punch bait and worms along channels, in coves, river channel and river mouth. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

Eufaula: August 20. Elevation rising, water murky. Blue and channel catfish good on cut bait and shad below the dam, along channels and the main lake. Striped bass excellent on live shad and topwater lures below the dam. Crappie and white bass good on minnows, grubs, jigs and tube jigs below the dam, around brush structure, docks and under bridges. Report submitted by David Robertson, game warden stationed in McIntosh County.

Hugo: August 20. Elevation above normal, water 81. Blue and channel catfish good on cut bait, live shad and shad below the dam. Crappie and white bass fair on minnows and jigs along creek channels, the river channel and standing timber. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw County.

Konawa: August 21. Elevation normal, water 94 and clear. Largemouth bass slow on buzz baits, crankbaits, plastic baits and topwater lures. Striped bass hybrids and white bass fair on crankbaits, live shad and spoons along the inlet, main lake and river channel. Channel catfish fair on chicken liver, cut bait, dough bait and shad in coves, inlet, main lake and along riprap. Report submitted by Garret Harley, game warden stationed in Seminole County.

Lower Mountain Fork: August 20. Elevation normal, water clear. Trout fair on plastic baits, PowerBait and worms along channels and rocks. Crappie fair on jigs around brush structure. Channel catfish good on cut bait and punch bait along creek channels and the main lake. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

McGee Creek: August 20. Elevation 3/4 ft. above normal, water 77 and clear. Largemouth and spotted bass slow on plastic baits in the main lake and along submerged humps. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush structure. Channel and flathead catfish fair on sunfish along riprap and rocks. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County.

Murray: August 22. Elevation normal, water 80 and clear. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass slow on Alabama rigs, crankbaits, flukes, plastic baits, sassy shad and topwater lures around brush structure, creek channels, points, rocks and weed beds. Spotted bass slow on crankbaits, hair jigs and sassy shad along channels, creek channels, the main lake and around points. Channel catfish fair on crawfish, punch bait, shad, shrimp and worms along channels, in coves and docks. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County.

Pine Creek: August 20. Elevation above normal, water murky. Largemouth bass fair on topwater lures around brush structure, channels and standing timber. Crappie fair on jigs around brush structure. Channel catfish good on cut bait and punch bait along creek channels and in the main lake. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

Robert S. Kerr: August 20. Elevation normal, water stained. Crappie slow on minnows at 14-16 ft. around standing timber. Largemouth bass good on plastic baits and spinnerbaits around points and weed beds. Channel catfish excellent on cut bait and live bait below the dam and along flats. Report submitted by J. D. Stauffer, game warden stationed in Haskell County.

Sardis: August 17. Elevation above normal, water 79 and clear. Largemouth and spotted bass slow on plastic baits and spinnerbaits around brush structure, points, shorelines and standing timber. Blue, channel and flathead catfish fair on cut bait, live bait, shad and sunfish in the main lake and along shorelines. Crappie fair on hair jigs, jigs, minnows and tube jigs around brush structure and standing timber. Report submitted by Dane Polk, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County.

Texoma: August 21. Elevation above normal, water murky. Striped and white bass good on flukes and shad along the dam, in the main lake, around points, riprap and spillway. Blue and channel catfish good on cut bait and live shad below the dam, around points, the river channel and river mouth. Crappie fair on minnows and jigs around brush structure and standing timber. Report submitted by Cody Jones, game warden stationed in Bryan County.

Wister: August 20. Elevation above normal, water 86 and stained. Largemouth bass slow on jigs around brush structure and in the main lake. Blue catfish fair on cut bait in the main lake. Crappie slow on minnows and jigs around brush structure, in the main lake and river channel. Report submitted by James Williams, game warden stationed in LeFlore County.

Press Release


Landowners can improve game bird populations on their land when they employ management techniques that have proven successful for that purpose.

 

To help landowners make a positive difference, the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation will host a Quail and Dove Management Field Day next month, and signup is under way now.


The event will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 8 at the headquarters of Cross Timbers Wildlife Management Area in south-central Oklahoma. Lunch will be provided to participants who register by Aug. 31.


Partners for the field day are the Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service and Quail Forever.


Dove management seminar topics will include field manipulation and food resources. Quail management topics will include information about grazing, burning, habitat and brush management with an equipment demonstration.
Admission is free. To register, send e-mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Directions: From Marietta, go west 14.5 miles on State Highway 32, then north 1.4 miles on Stockton Road to the Cross Timbers headquarters on the east side of the road. Signs will be posted.

A service of the Oklahoma Wildlife Department

 

Arbuckle: August 5. Elevation normal, water 87 and clear. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass biting fair on crankbaits, jigs, flukes and spinnerbaits around brush structure, shorelines, main lake and rocks. Crappie slow on jigs and minnows around brush structures, docks, creek channels and docks. Bluegill, green and redear sunfish good on worms and fly rod with black ant in coves and main lake. Report submitted by Jack Melton.

 

Blue River: August 8. Elevation normal, water 76 and clear. Smallmouth, largemouth and spotted bass good on crankbaits, sassy shad and topwater lures in brush structure, off rocks, along shorelines and top water best at dawn and dusk in slack water. Channel catfish good on chicken liver, punch bait and stinkbait. In brush structure, off rocks, sandbars and deeper pools below obstructions in current. Green, bluegill and redear sunfish excellent on crickets, grubs and small lures in shallows and along shorelines. Submitted by Matt Gamble, biologist at the Blue River Public Fishing and Hunting Area.

 

Broken Bow: August 6. Elevation below normal, water 83. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass fair on crankbaits and plastic baits around brush structure, points, main lake and standing timber. Crappie fair on jigs, tube jigs and minnows around brush structure and standing timber. Report submitted by Dru Polk, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

 

Eufaula: August 6. Elevation normal, water murky. White bass, striped bass and striped bass hybrids fair on live shad below the dam. Blue, channel and flathead catfish good on cut bait and live bait in main lake, below the dam and along the river channel. Crappie fair on jigs around brush structures. Report submitted by Terry Springwater, game warden stationed in Garvin County.

 

Hugo: August 6. Elevation normal, water 84. Blue catfish fair on shad below the dam. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows in creek channels, river channels and standing timber. Report submitted by Jay Harvey, game warden stationed in Choctaw County.

 

Konawa: August 7. Elevation normal, water 94 and clear. Largemouth bass slow on crankbaits, jigs, plastics and topwater lures in main lake, around points, the river channels and weed beds. Striped bass hybrids and white bass fair on crankbaits, live shad and spoons in coves, inlet, main lake and river mouth. Channel catfish fair on chicken liver, cut bait, dough bait and shad in coves, inlet and riprap. Report submitted by Garret Harley, game warden stationed in Seminole County.

 

Lower Mountain Fork: August 6. Elevation normal, water clear. Rainbow trout good on plastics, small lures, tube jigs and worms in the creek channels, rocks and spillway. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in Mccurtain County.

 

McGee Creek: August 6. Elevation above normal, water 75 and clear. Crappie good on jigs and minnows around brush structure and close to creek channels. Largemouth and spotted bass slow on plastic baits around submerged humps and min lake. Channel and flathead catfish fair on sunfish along riprap and around rocks. Report submitted by Larry Luman, game warden stationed in Atoka County.

 

Murray: August 7. Elevation normal, water 80 and clear. Largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass slow on flukes, jerk bait, plastics, sassy shad and topwater lures in brush structures points, riprap, rocks and weed beds. Channel catfish fair on punch bait, shad and shrimp in ceer channels, docks, flats, river channels and rocks. Bluegill, redear and green sunfish biting on jigs, minnows, tube jigs and worms in docks, rocks, shallows and weed beds. Report submitted by Jeremy Brothers, game warden stationed in Carter County.

 

Pine Creek: August 6. Elevation rising, water clear. Largemouth bass good on buzz baits and topwater lures around coves. Crappie excellent on jigs in standing timber. Channel catfish fair on cut bait, punch bait and worms in creek channels, coves, river channel and main lake. Report submitted by Mark Hannah, game warden stationed in McCurtain County.

 

Robert S. Kerr: August 6. Elevation normal, water 87 and stained. Largemouth bass good on jigs, plastics and spinnerbaits around points, riprap and main lake. Channel catfish fair on shad along flats and rocks. Crappie slow on minnows in standing timber. Report submitted by J.D. Stauffer, game warden stationed in Haskell County.

 

Sardis: August 5. Elevation normal, water 88. Largemouth and spotted bass fair on crankbaits, spinnerbaits, plastic baits, rogues, buzzbaits and topwater lures around brush structure, points, riprap, shorelines, standing timber and weed beds. Channel, blue and flathead catfish fair on cut bait, shad and sunfish in the main lake, channels and shoreline. Crappie fair on jigs, minnows, hair jigs and tube jigs around bush structure and tailwaters. Report submitted by Dane Polk, game warden stationed in Pushmataha County.

 

Texoma: August 7. Elevation rising, water murky. Striped bass hybrids and white bass good on flukes, hair jigs and live shad in coves, points, spillway and below the dam. Blue and flathead catfish fair on chicken liver, shad, cut bait and sunfish in riprap, points, main lake, channels and below the dam. Largemouth bass good on crankbaits, plastics and spinnerbaits in main lake, points and rocks. Report submitted by Cody Jones, game warden stationed in Mcintosh County.

 

Wister: August 6. Elevation above normal, water 85 and stained. Largemouth biting fair on jigs, plastics and topwater around brush structures, main lake, points and the river channel. Blue and channel catfish fair on cut bait, punch bait and grasshoppers in the main lake and flats. Crappie fair on minnows and tube jigs around brush structures, main lake, creek channels and river channel. Report submitted by James Williams, game warden stationed in Leflore County.

 

A service of the Oklahoma Wildlife Department

 

 

Beginning deer hunters have a unique opportunity to participate in one of two bonus antlerless deer hunts that will take place on private lands in Love County (Oct. 20, 2017, orientation on Oct. 19, 2017) and Ellis County (Oct. 27-28, 2017).


This year, 35 youths will be selected to receive one of the bonus private lands antlerless deer gun permits. To be eligible, youths must have completed the hunter education requirements prior to applying and must be 12-17 years old at the time of their scheduled hunt.


"These hunts are on private property and should provide young hunters a great opportunity to see some deer as well as a chance to potentially harvest a doe," said Bill Dinkines, Assistant Chief of Wildlife for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

 

"The Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Commission has endorsed the youth hunt program, and we are thankful for the landowners' willingness to allow these kids the opportunity to hunt on their property."


To apply for a hunt, applicants must fill out an application no later than 4:30 p.m. Aug. 15, 2017, at www.wildlifedepartment.com with the following information:
• Hunter's first and last name.
• Date of birth.
• Mailing address.
• Telephone number.
• Hunter education certification number.
• Lifetime license number, if applicable.
• Accompanying adult* first and last name.
• List of hunts by order of preference.**
*Each youth participating in this hunt must have an adult (licensed or unlicensed) who is at least 21 years of age accompanying them on the hunt.
**List the hunt(s) you wish to apply for by order of preference (Please do not list any hunt that you are not interested in or that you know in advance you cannot attend.)


Antlerless deer taken by selected applicants during these hunts will be considered a "bonus deer" and will not count toward the hunter's statewide season limit.


Applicants whose names are successfully drawn will receive a notification letter in the mail that includes specific information about their hunt and the deadline for buying the required license(s) as listed here:

 

Resident Options, Ages 12-15:
• Lifetime Hunting or Lifetime Combination License OR ...
• $10 Controlled Hunts Private Land Youth Deer License.***
Resident Options, Ages 16-17:
• Lifetime Hunting or Lifetime Combination License OR ...
• Resident Youth Annual Hunting License + $10 Controlled Hunts Private Land Youth Deer License*** OR ...
• Resident Youth Fiscal Year Hunting License + $10 Controlled Hunts Private Land Youth Deer License*** OR ...
• Resident Youth Fiscal Year Combination License + $10 Controlled Hunts Private Land Youth Deer License.***
Non-Resident Options, Ages 12-17:
• $201 Controlled Hunts Nonresident Private Land Youth Deer License.***


***NOTE: The $10 Resident or the $201 Nonresident Controlled Hunts Private Land Youth Deer Hunt Licenses will be issued in lieu of the open season license and must be purchased through the Wildlife Department's Headquarters Office, 2145 N.E. 36th St. in Oklahoma City. No Apprentice Licenses will be allowed due to the hunter education requirement.


If you have any questions before applying, please call Kyle Johnson at (405) 590-2584.

The mission of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation is the management, protection, and enhancement of wildlife resources and habitat for the scientific, educational, recreational, aesthetic, and economic benefits to present and future generations of citizens and visitors to Oklahoma.

 

 

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