Tuesday, 07 July 2020 14:02

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19 July 7, 2020

OSDH Press Release

As of this advisory, there are 17,220 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. 

There were five new deaths; none occurred in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Carter County, a male in the 65 and older age group. 
  • One in Delaware County, a female in the 65 and older age group. 
  • One in Garvin County, a male in the 50 - 64 age group. 
  • One in McCurtain County, a male in the 65 and older age group. 
  • One in Muskogee County, one female in the 65 and older age group.

There are 404 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Confirmed Positive Cases

17,220

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date 

371,798

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date 

391,881

**Currently Hospitalized 

426

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations

1,741

Deaths in the Past 24 hours

0

Total Cumulative Deaths

404

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

**This number is a combination of hospitalized positive cases and hospitalized persons under investigation, as reported by hospitals at the time of the report. The data reflect a change in calculation and should not be compared to prior data. 

***The purpose of publishing aggregated statistical COVID-19 data through the OSDH Dashboard, the Executive Order Report, and the Weekly Epidemiology and Surveillance Report is to support the needs of the general public in receiving important and necessary information regarding the state of the health and safety of the citizens of Oklahoma. These resources may be used only for statistical purposes and may not be used in any way that would determine the identity of any reported cases.

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2020-07-07 at 7:00 a.m.

Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

Monday, 06 July 2020 08:19

EOMC Menu for 07/06/2020-07/11/2020.

Eastern Oklahoma Medical Center Cafeteria Menu - OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 

Monday, July 6- Enchiladas, Corn Spanish Rice, Refried Beans.

Tuesday, July 7- Pulled Pork Sandwiches, Baked Beans, Seasoned Potato Wedges.

Wednesday, July 8- Garlic & Herb Chicken, Antigua Veggies, Scalloped Potatoes.

Thursday, July 9- Brats and Fried Cabbage, California Veggies, New Potatoes.

Friday, July 10- Boneless Wings, Carrots, Texas Potatoes, Chicken Poblano Soup.

Thursday, 02 July 2020 17:27

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19 July 2, 2020

OSDH Press Release

As of this advisory, there are 14,539 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. 

There are six additional deaths; one of them occurred in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Tulsa County, a female in the 65 and older age group.    
  • Two in Comanche County, both females in the 65 and older age group.    
  • Three in McCurtain County, a female in the 65 and older age group, a male in the 65 and older age group and a male in the 50-64 age group. 

There are 395 total deaths in the state.

The OSDH has launched a new testing site dashboard, which includes an interactive map and updated site contact information. Please call test sites to make an appointment and confirm hours of operation before visiting.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

In recognition of the Fourth of July, all OSDH offices and county health departments will be closed on Friday, July 3. There will not be a Media Advisory on Friday, July 3 or Saturday, July 4, but coronavirus.health.ok.gov will continue to be updated daily with labs processing COVID-19 tests from across the State through the weekend. The weekly Epidemiology Report will be released on Monday, July 6. 

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Confirmed Positive Cases

14,539

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date 

338,511

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date 

355,200

**Currently Hospitalized 

368

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations

1,615

Deaths in the Past 24 hours

1

Total Cumulative Deaths

395

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

**This number is a combination of hospitalized positive cases and hospitalized persons under investigation, as reported by hospitals at the time of the report. The data reflect a change in calculation and should not be compared to prior data. 

***The purpose of publishing aggregated statistical COVID-19 data through the OSDH Dashboard, the Executive Order Report, and the Weekly Epidemiology and Surveillance Report is to support the needs of the general public in receiving important and necessary information regarding the state of the health and safety of the citizens of Oklahoma. These resources may be used only for statistical purposes and may not be used in any way that would determine the identity of any reported cases.

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2020-07-02 at 7:00 a.m.

Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

Thursday, 02 July 2020 16:29

Lean Cuisine Fettuccini Alfredo Recall

USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service Press Release

WASHINGTON, May 28, 2020 – Nestle Prepared Foods Company, a Jonesboro, Ark. establishment, is recalling approximately 29,002 pounds of chicken product labeled as Lean Cuisine Fettuccini Alfredo because the product contains undeclared soy, a known allergen, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The Lean Cuisine Fettuccini Alfredo is not supposed to contain chicken and chicken does not appear in the ingredients statement or on the label.[View Labels (PDF Only)]  

The frozen, Lean Cuisine Fettuccini Alfredo products were produced and packaged on April 22, 2020. The following products are subject to recall:

  • 9 1/4-oz. retail carton containing “LEAN CUISINE favorites Fettuccini Alfredo tender pasta with a creamy cheese sauce” with a lot code “0113587812 A,” “0113587812 B,” “0113587812 C,” or “0113587812 D” and a date of “MAY 2021” on side of the label.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “P27333” printed on the package next to the lot code. The products were distributed in shipping cartons labeled as LC Chicken Fettuccini bearing the mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

The problem was discovered when the firm received multiple consumer complaints that the product labeled as Lean Cuisine Fettuccini Alfredo contained chicken that is not referenced on the label or ingredients.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.  

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify that recalling firms are notifying their customers of the recall and that actions are being taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Nestle Prepared Foods Company here or (800) 993-8625. Members of the media with questions about the recall can contact Kate Shaw, Nestlé USA Corporate Communications, at .  

Consumers with food safety questions can call the toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) or live chat via Ask USDA from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Consumers can also browse food safety messages at Ask USDA or send a question via email to . For consumers that need to report a problem with a meat, poultry, or egg product, the online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at https://foodcomplaint.fsis.usda.gov/eCCF/

The arrival of the novel coronavirus brought many challenges to the health care community. Doctors, researchers, and policymakers around the world had to face the virus and determine the best ways to keep their communities safe. This discussion and collaboration resulted in many medical practice and policy innovations. The military is no exception. Health care professionals throughout the Military Health System worked together to address the new normal, changing how care should be brought to patients worldwide.

U.S. Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Thomas McCaffery iterated that innovation in the MHS supports the Department of Defense's priorities in COVID-19: protect the workforce, maintain military readiness, and support the national response.

“The Military Health System is serving on the frontlines against this invisible enemy,” McCaffery said, “bringing all that we have to bear across our military medical expertise, research and development, and our far-reaching, world-class system of health care and military medical combat support capabilities."

Each category McCaffery mentioned supports patient-centered care. With the quick spread of the novel coronavirus and COVID-19, hospitals and clinics found creative ways to care for patients while preventing spread of the disease. Inventive practices like drive-up pharmacies and immunization clinics allowed patients to continue receiving medication without having to set foot in the hospital. MHS expedited COVID-19 and flu test results to help patients take action quickly if their results came back positive.

Many hospitals also increased their telehealth capabilities, caring for patients over the phone or via video call when they could. Channels like the MHS Nurse Advice Line saw a higher call volume in the initial rush of the pandemic. The Defense Health Agency even made temporary changes to telehealth regulations so patients could enjoy more access to telehealth services, and health care providers could expand their reach to provide it. 

The fight against the novel coronavirus forced military health care professionals to get creative with ways to safely provide care to patients. Innovative practices like the drive-thru pharmacy at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, help providers give this care while working to reduce the spread of COVID-19. 
 

Within hospitals, unique problems arose that required solutions. A team from Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi, Mississippi, prototyped a proning shelf to help COVID-19 patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome breathe easier. Scientists and engineers at Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division developed low-cost, easily-assembled ventilators as part of the DoD Hack-a-Vent Innovation Challenge. Once FDA-approved, these ventilators can be rapidly prototyped and used to support critical care requirements like complications from COVID-19 in hospital and field settings around the world.

Clinical and inpatient pharmacists at William Beaumont Army Medical Center in El Paso, Texas, collaborated with nursing to change how they administer medicine to patients by bundling medications. They adjusted dosing times to align with meal delivery schedules, morning labs, or vital sign checks as much as possible while maintaining safety and efficacy of the medications. This prevents frequent comings and goings in patients' hospital rooms. In doing so, exposure to both patients and staff is minimized. Critical personal protective equipment is also preserved.

Providers were aided by DoD and the Department of Veterans Affairs launching the joint health information exchange. This electronic exchange helps medical professionals safely and securely access patient health information and medical records, and share it as necessary to provide care. The JHIE supports more informed decision-making for the health care of service members, veterans, and family members, regardless of where patients access care.

DHA also gathered experts from the field to create a tri-service Infection Prevention and Control Tiger Team. The IPC Tiger Team provides evidence-based answers about COVID-19 to roughly 475 military hospitals, medical clinics, and dental clinics within the MHS.

As hospital and clinic operations changed to meet new challenges, the MHS required more boots on the ground to provide health care to patients. Military hospitals in New York City and Los Angeles quickly reached capacity to treat patients with COVID-19, so DoD deployed hospital ships, USNS Comfort to New York and USNS Mercy to Los Angeles for medical support. In addition, National Guard reservists answered the call to help staff overwhelmed hospitals in New York City.

Medical students at the Uniformed Services University for Health Sciences also stepped up to staff hospitals. USU adjusted coursework for its students to learn more about COVID-19, and many of those students graduated early to support the MHS as doctors and nurses.

While hospitals staffed up on the front end, the country still needed to find a vaccine on the back end. MHS professionals in research and development aid in the quest for a vaccine. Researchers at DHA’s Joint Pathology Center added their expertise to the mix to help health care providers better understand COVID-19. JPC studies tissue samples under the microscope, showing patterns that emerge from the damage that the respiratory virus leaves in the human body.

New approaches to genome sequencing have been critical to this equation. The Global Emerging Infections Surveillance section of DHA’s Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch used existing partnerships with Army, Navy, and Air Force public health and medical research laboratories to research genome sequencing. The team worked together to create a collaborative approach to sequencing the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, or SARS-CoV-2, genome. This virus strain causes COVID-19.

The Air Force Genetics Center of Excellence at Keesler AFB also conducted research with DoD partners into sequencing SARS-CoV-2. Through these partnerships, DoD researchers gained the ability to isolate the virus, share samples, and compare laboratory methods to improve genome sequencing capabilities.

Although many strides have been made to combat the novel coronavirus, there is still room for innovation. The expansion of telework capabilities in response to the national emergency may become a part of the “new normal.” Research into convalescent plasma from patients who have contracted and recovered from COVID-19 can help researchers develop an effective treatment for the disease.

The MHS stands ready to continue innovating to provide quality health care to its beneficiaries throughout the armed forces and support the safety of the nation.

“We remain focused on supporting the Department in this complex and challenging environment with the best that military medicine has to offer,” McCaffery said. “We are proudly continuing to deliver on that obligation.”

 

OKLAHOMA CITY – The Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy (OICA) expressed its gratitude to state voters for the passage of State Question 802, the proposal to expand Medicaid in the state.

The question passed with just over 50.4 percent of the vote and a 6,488 majority. The organization’s Board of Directors endorsed the state question earlier this year.

As part of the organization’s support, it produced and distributed a 30-second television commercial along with several digital and print advertisements and a dedicated web page on the OICA website focused on State Question 802. OICA’s advertising was fact-based. The television commercial presented the fact that children are 29 percent more likely to get at least one well-child visit each year in families with health care. The projected 200,000 Oklahomans who will get coverage when the constitutional amendment takes effect on July 1, 2021, will overwhelmingly be working families, most with children. “The opponents of the state question chose to focus on fear and hyperbole – in short, they were blatantly misleading about parts the state question,” Dorman said. “OICA took a different track. We chose to show how Medicaid expansion will help make Oklahoma a healthier state for families and children.” Dorman said it took every individual and organization working together to cut through the efforts by some to “muddy the waters” on the state question and secure its passage.

“There was not a single vote, a single person who fought for better health care, or a single organization that signed on to support and committed resources to spare with this vote,” he said. “This was a victory for all Oklahomans. It took all of us – child advocacy, health care, faith-based, and business organizations, and countless devoted individuals – to make this win a reality. “As voters went to the polls Tuesday, Oklahoma had the second worst rate of insurance coverage in the nation. Now, and only now, Oklahoma is truly on its way to becoming a ‘top ten’ state.” 

 

About OICA: The Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy was established in 1983 by a group of citizens seeking to create a strong advocacy network that would provide a voice for the needs of children and youth in Oklahoma, particularly those in the state’s care and those growing up amid poverty, violence, abuse and neglect, disparities, or other situations that put their lives and future at risk. Our mission statement: “Creating awareness, taking action and changing policy to improve the health, safety, and well-being of Oklahoma’s children.”

 

Wednesday, 01 July 2020 17:13

Stay Food Safe this July Fourth

USDA Press Release

WASHINGTON, July 1, 2020 – Many Americans will be celebrating the Fourth of July outdoors this year a little differently, with celebrations at home, including backyard barbecues and picnics perhaps with only your household. No matter how you’re celebrating the Fourth of July, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) encourages you to make food safety and other public health recommendations a part of your celebration.

“Foodborne illness can increase during summer because of the warmer temperatures and extended time spent outside,” said Dr. Mindy Brashears, the USDA’s Under Secretary for Food Safety. “You may not be grilling at the park this year, but instead you may be grilling at home. As we celebrate this Fourth of July holiday, I encourage consumers to use food safety steps to reduce their risk of illness.”

Follow these tips from USDA to ensure a food safe Fourth of July:

Don’t Cross-Contaminate

Always keep raw meat and their juices from touching other foods. While grilling, avoid using the same utensils for cooked and ready-to-eat foods that were previously used with raw meat or poultry products. Wash and sanitize all surfaces and utensils after they touch raw items. A recent USDA survey showed that 34 percent of respondents do not follow an important step to use a different utensil to take food off the grill. Bring enough tools to keep your raw meat and poultry away from any cooked or ready-to-eat foods and have extra cleaning and sanitizing supplies ready for your surfaces, plates and utensils.

Use a Food Thermometer

Some grill masters may say they know their food is done just by looking at its color when it comes off the grill. That’s not possible and shouldn’t be relied upon. This is where a food thermometer comes in.

“More than 25 percent of burgers can turn brown inside before they are fully cooked,” says FSIS Administrator Paul Kiecker. “Although your grilled foods may look done, foodborne illness causing germs are not killed until the safe internal temperature has been reached. Using a food thermometer is the only way to know your food is done and safe to eat.”

The USDA recommended safe minimum internal temperatures are:

  • Beef, pork, lamb and veal (steaks, roasts and chops): 145°F then rest for three-minutes 
  • Fish: 145°F
  • Ground meats (beef, pork, lamb and veal): 160°F
  • Whole poultry, poultry breasts and ground poultry: 165°F

Keep Foods at a Safe Temperature

Perishable food items should not be left outside for more than two hours, and only one hour if the temperature is at or above 90°F. Keep your food at or below 40°F, in coolers or containers with a cold source, such as ice or frozen gel packs. This includes any leftovers from the grill, cold salads and even cut fruits and vegetables. Leftovers should be refrigerated or placed back in the cooler within 2 hours of being placed outside (1 hour if temperatures are at or above 90°F). If you are not sure how long food has been sitting out, throw it out immediately.

If you have questions about these tips, or any other food safety topics, call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) or chat live at ask.usda.gov from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday.

Wednesday, 01 July 2020 17:07

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19 July 1, 2020

OSDH Press Release

As of this advisory, there are 14,112 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. 

There are two additional deaths; neither occurred in the past 24 hours.

  • Two in Tulsa County, both males in the 65 and older age group.    

There are 389 total deaths in the state.

The State of Oklahoma has set aside a portion of Coronavirus Relief Funds to be distributed in the form of grants, called the LTC CARES Grant, to enhance infectious disease prevention and mitigation as part of the implementation of Oklahoma’s plan for Phased Reopening in Long-Term Care Facilities. Click here to learn more.

The OSDH has launched a new testing site dashboard, which includes an interactive map and updated site contact information. Please call test sites to make an appointment and confirm hours of operation before visiting.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

In recognition of the Fourth of July, all OSDH offices and county health departments will be closed on Friday, July 3. 

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Confirmed Positive Cases

14,112

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date 

332,201

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date 

348,350

**Currently Hospitalized 

374

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations

1,553

Deaths in the Past 24 hours

0

Total Cumulative Deaths

389

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

**This number is a combination of hospitalized positive cases and hospitalized persons under investigation, as reported by hospitals at the time of the report. The data reflect a change in calculation and should not be compared to prior data. 

***The purpose of publishing aggregated statistical COVID-19 data through the OSDH Dashboard, the Executive Order Report, and the Weekly Epidemiology and Surveillance Report is to support the needs of the general public in receiving important and necessary information regarding the state of the health and safety of the citizens of Oklahoma. These resources may be used only for statistical purposes and may not be used in any way that would determine the identity of any reported cases.

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2020-07-01 at 7:00 a.m.

Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

Saturday, 27 June 2020 16:00

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19 June 27, 2020

OSDH Press Release

As of this advisory, there are 12,642 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. 

There are seven additional deaths; two of them occurred in the past 24 hours.

  • One in Tulsa County, a female in the 50-64 age group. 
  • One in Caddo County, a male in the 50-64 age group. 
  • One in McCurtain County, a male in the 65 and older age group.  
  • Two in Muskogee County, a male in the 65 and older age group and a female in the 65 and older age group.  
  • One in Wagoner County, a male in the 65 and older age group.  
  • One in Washington County, a female in the 65 and older age group.  

There are 384 total deaths in the state.

This week's Oklahoma COVID-19 Weekly Report is now available. Reports from weeks past can be found here.

The OSDH has launched a new testing site dashboard, which includes an interactive map and updated site contact information. Please call test sites to make an appointment and confirm hours of operation before visiting.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Confirmed Positive Cases

12,642

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date 

313,021

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date 

327,683

**Currently Hospitalized 

329

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations

1,440

Deaths in the Past 24 hours

2

Total Cumulative Deaths

384

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

**This number is a combination of hospitalized positive cases and hospitalized persons under investigation, as reported by hospitals at the time of the report. The data reflect a change in calculation and should not be compared to prior data. 

***The purpose of publishing aggregated statistical COVID-19 data through the OSDH Dashboard, the Executive Order Report, and the Weekly Epidemiology and Surveillance Report is to support the needs of the general public in receiving important and necessary information regarding the state of the health and safety of the citizens of Oklahoma. These resources may be used only for statistical purposes and may not be used in any way that would determine the identity of any reported cases.

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2020-06-27 at 7:00 a.m.

Detailed case statistics are published on the website.

Click here for more information.

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