Friday, 18 September 2020 17:05

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19 September 18, 2020

OSDH Health Advisory

This week, there are 11 additional counties in the "orange" risk phase. OSDH continues to monitor closely the statewide hospitalization trends for COVID-19.

The COVID-19 Alert map will be updated every Friday in the Situation Update at 11:00 a.m. This week’s map can be seen in this update below the test results chart.

As OSDH continues to meet with stakeholders across the state, the COVID-19 Alert Map is subject to further revisions as science and public health guidance advances with the ongoing pandemic.

As of this advisory, there are 74,567 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. 

There are 9 additional deaths identified to report. No deaths were identified in the past 24 hours.  

  • Two in Grady County, two males in the 65 or older age group. 
  • One in Harper County, one female in the 65 or older age group. 
  • One in Le Flore County, one male in the 65 or older age group. 
  • Two in Oklahoma County, one female and one male in the 65 or older age group.   
  • One in Payne County, one male in the 65 or older age group. 
  • One in Sequoyah County, one male in the 65 or older age group. 
  • One in Tulsa County, one male in the 50 - 64 age group. 

There are 939 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Confirmed Positive Cases

74,567

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date  

979,650

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date  

1,066,896

**Currently Hospitalized 

516

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations

5,755

Identified Deaths in the Past 24 hours

0

Total Cumulative Deaths

939

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

**This number is a combination of hospitalized positive cases and hospitalized persons under investigation, as reported by hospitals at the time of the report. The data reflect a change in calculation and should not be compared to prior data. 

***The purpose of publishing aggregated statistical COVID-19 data through the OSDH Dashboard, the Executive Order Report, and the Weekly Epidemiology and Surveillance Report is to support the needs of the general public in receiving important and necessary information regarding the state of the health and safety of the citizens of Oklahoma. These resources may be used only for statistical purposes and may not be used in any way that would determine the identity of any reported cases.

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2020-09-18 at 7:00 a.m.

Oklahoma COVID-19 Alert System

 sept 18 map

COVID-19 Alert Map

As of September 17, 2020

Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

For Immediate Release

COVID-19 SPREAD INDICATORS UNDER FIRE, WHAT TO WATCH BETWEEN NOW AND NOVEMBER, COLLEGE SPORTS, & PREPARING FOR FLU SEASON

COVIDEXITSTRATEGY.ORG, UNITED STATES OF CARE, RESOLVE TO SAVE LIVES, COVID ACT NOW AND DUKE-MARGOLIS CENTER FOR HEALTH POLICY HELD PRESS BRIEFING TO DISCUSS CURRENT STATE OF COVID-19

(Washington, DC) Yesterday, CovidExitStrategy.org, United States of Care, Resolve to Save Lives, COVID Act Now, and the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy held a press webinar outlining new data on COVID-19 spread indicators, college hotspots and addressed how states can prepare for flu season.  You can view the video of the webinar here.

“United States of Care is constantly talking to people across the country about COVID-19 and the state of healthcare in the U.S. We have found that Americans want accurate and reliable data and Covidexitstrategy.org meets that need, by supplying real-time data on where their state stands in the battle against COVD-19,” stated Emily Barson, United States of Care Executive Director. “As we prepare for the flu season, accurate and timely data is crucial and must be used to inform the public and policymakers on how we can stay safe and healthy, ” added Barson. 

CovidExitStrategy.org was founded by a group of public health and crisis experts, with previous experience working at the White House, Department of Health and Human Services, and on the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. COVID Exit Strategy is a non-partisan group of experts who have worked across multiple administrations.  

In an overview of the states’ efforts to contain COVID-19, Marta Wosinska, Deputy Director at the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy, noted that the national trend in COVID-19 cases hides important regional variation in the prevalence of COVID-19.  “After a wave that hit the Sunbelt states this summer, the spread has shifted towards the Midwest.  North Dakota now has more COVID-19 cases per million than the hard-hit Texas ever had.” 

“COVID continues to disproportionately affect our country’s most vulnerable groups: those who are older, who are poorer, who have less access to healthcare, who have less decision-making power,” said Debbie Lai, COO of CovidActNow.org.

“Our understanding of the spread of COVID-19 and its impacts is becoming less clear over time, because of ongoing issues around data and inconsistent reporting of key indicators.  Our national response will continue to be hampered by data gaps and implementation of policies based on suboptimal data.” remarked Cyrus Shahpar of Resolve to Save Lives. 

“The most reliable sources for COVID-19 spread continue to be from academia (like John Hopkins University), journalists (like the New York Times), and collaboratives (like The COVID Tracking Project).  said Ryan Panchadsaram, Co-Founder of CovidExitStrategy.org, “Unfortunately, the federal government continues to accumulate critical data related to the COVID response, but does not share it with the public. To date, only one dataset from HHS Protect has been made public so far on HealthData.gov: the hospital utilization snapshot.”  

As part of the briefing, Christina Silcox, Managing Associate at the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy highlighted two recent Duke-Margolis reports related to testing: a primer on diagnostics entitled From Development to Market: Understanding COVID-19 Testing and Its Challenges,” and a framework for public health officials and community leaders in schools, businesses and other institutions on how to use Covid-19 screening test strategies to operate safely and prevent further spread of the virus (“A National Decision Point: Effective Testing and Screening for Covid-19”).  

“There is a critical need for more testing in this country, but more importantly, for smart testing--matching the right test for the right purpose at the right time. Equally important is making sure we can act on those test results to actively break chains of transmission and respond quickly as rates of active infection changes in our communities over time,” said Silcox.

Additionally, United States of Care discussed their new “Preparing for COVID-19 and the Flu,” recommendations to states for dealing with the seasonal flu amid a global public health crisis caused by the novel coronavirus.

“2020 is a completely different year when it comes to flu season. Our health care system is already stressed and now we face the unprecedented problem of fighting the fly while combatting COVID-19. We have spent months engaging in one-on-one conversations with people, policymakers, and various health care leaders and understand what people need to know and what states can do to combat COVID-19 while fighting the flu,” stated Liz Hagan, United States of Care’s Director of Policy for State Engagements.  “Historically States have successfully dealt with the flu virus through vaccines and preemptive care to stop widespread outbreaks.  Our recommendations can help states prepare for the fall and beyond,” added Hagan. 

United States of Care’s “Preparing for COVID-19 and the Flu” breaks down how states can prepare for dealing with the flu and COVID-19 simultaneously. It includes the following suggestions:

  1. Communicate Clearly: State leaders need to be clear in their communications about why protective measures, such as mask requirements and closures, are necessary to keep people safe from the flu and COVID-19. States can play a vital role in providing people with clarity about what to do if they are infected with either the flu or COVID-19, as they have similar symptoms

  2. Prepare for Increased Health Care Demand: States need to have contingency plans in place so that health care system resources can be efficiently allocated. 

  3. Address the Needs of High-Risk People: States will need to continually rely on the latest COVID-19 metrics and data on the flu’s trajectory, especially for high-risk populations to take additional measures. 

  4. Develop Plans to Increase Influenza Vaccination Rates: In a typical flu season, less than 50% of people get vaccinated, and the rate is even lower among people of color. Increasing this rate is essential to minimizing the strain on our health care system. Clear communications are also vital due to people’s ongoing concerns about receiving medical care during the pandemic. States will need to develop plans to distribute flu shots in safe-settings, including at home for vulnerable populations. 

Thursday, 17 September 2020 17:04

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19 September 17, 2020

OSDH Advisory

As of this advisory, there are 73,318 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. 

There are 6 additional deaths identified to report. Two deaths were identified in the past 24 hours.  

  • One in Garfield County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Grady County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Lincoln County, one female in the 65 or older age group. 
  • One in McCurtain County, one male in the 65 or older age group. 
  • Two in Tulsa County, one male in the 50 - 64 age group and one male in the 65 or older age group.  

There are 930 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Confirmed Positive Cases

73,318

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date  

966,519

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date  

1,052,756

**Currently Hospitalized 

516

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations

5,698

Identified Deaths in the Past 24 hours

2

Total Cumulative Deaths

930

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

**This number is a combination of hospitalized positive cases and hospitalized persons under investigation, as reported by hospitals at the time of the report. The data reflect a change in calculation and should not be compared to prior data. 

***The purpose of publishing aggregated statistical COVID-19 data through the OSDH Dashboard, the Executive Order Report, and the Weekly Epidemiology and Surveillance Report is to support the needs of the general public in receiving important and necessary information regarding the state of the health and safety of the citizens of Oklahoma. These resources may be used only for statistical purposes and may not be used in any way that would determine the identity of any reported cases.

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2020-09-17 at 7:00 a.m.

Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

Headaches are the most common form of pain, according to the National Institutes of Health’s National Library of Medicine. 

Service members with concussion-related headaches often experience more frequent and severe pain compared to those with headaches unrelated to this condition, according to recently published data from the Warrior Strong Study. This multi-year research project was conducted by the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, a division of the Defense Health Agency Research and Development Directorate.

Headaches remain the most frequently reported symptom among service members who have sustained concussions, also known as mild traumatic brain injuries. Seventy-four percent of participants in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom had post-traumatic headaches within 30 days of sustaining a concussion, as reported by DVBIC.

Between 2009 and 2015, DVBIC researchers surveyed more than 1,500 soldiers, and then followed up with them after three months, then again after six months, and finally, a year later.

“We wanted to find out how active-duty soldiers were doing after coming back from the war zone with concussion,” said Karen Schwab, DVBIC researcher and the study’s principal investigator. Ultimately, the findings may inform DVBIC’s future clinical recommendations and guidelines in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of concussions in the U.S. armed forces.

In total, researchers interviewed 1,567 soldiers from combat operations in Afghanistan and Iraq during post deployment health assessments at Fort Carson, Colorado and Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Participants answered 31 headache-related questions to help researchers identify post-traumatic headaches. The soldiers were asked about how frequent and how painful their headaches were, compared to before they deployed, and if their headaches changed after an injury, illness, or some other event during deployment.

Of the 1,094 soldiers who reported headaches, 557 had also experienced concussions. For soldiers whose headaches were related to their concussion, symptoms were more severe and more often led to medical consultation, compared to the group whose headaches were unrelated to TBI.

Post-traumatic headaches often resemble migraines, a painful sensation in the head often associated with nausea and sensitivity to light, among other symptoms.

Notably, the gender composition of the Warrior Strong study differed markedly from studies of migraine headaches in civilian populations. Overall, 91% of the Warrior Strong participants and 94% of those with concussions were male. By contrast, civilian clinical studies on migraines are performed on groups that are around 80% women, a reflection of the demographic fact that adult women are two-to-three times more likely to suffer from migraines than men.

“The evidence base for treating headaches is not specific to post-traumatic headaches. And it may or may not be relevant for treating them. We really don’t know,” said Ann Scher, a professor of epidemiology at Uniformed Services University and the study’s corresponding author.

While there are no specific drug therapies for post-traumatic headaches approved by the Food and Drug Administration, the study results could lead to the design of clinical trials and the development of targeted pharmaceutical remedies, Scher said.

Fortunately, there are multiple behavior changes and medical modalities to treat and reduce the severity of post-traumatic headaches; these include improving sleep patterns, muscle relaxation, anxiety reducing techniques, physical therapy, cognitive behavior therapy, and acupuncture.

To help patients in their care, DVBIC developed the Headache Virtual Suite to offer health care providers a step-by-step process to determine the type of post-traumatic headaches and guidance on its evaluation and treatment.

After her second TBI, former soldier Stephanie Ehlers was told by her medical provider to rest for 24 hours without providing additional therapeutic guidance. When her TBI was more accurately diagnosed a few years later, the former Army Medical Service Corps officer learned various coping methods that set her on the road to recovery.

Ehlers, who also described her experiences as part of DVBIC’s educational campaign called ‘A Head for the Future’, concluded by stating, “Early identification and early treatment of TBI is so important.”

Tuesday, 15 September 2020 17:46

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19 September 15, 2020

OSDH Advisory

As of this advisory, there are 71,314 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. 

There are 7 additional deaths identified to report. No deaths were identified in the past 24 hours.  

  • One in Creek County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Jackson County, one male in the 50 - 64 age group.
  • One in Oklahoma County, one male in the 65 or older age group. 
  • One in Tillman County, one female in the 65 or older age group.  
  • Three in Tulsa County, one female and two males in the 65 or older age group. 

There are 912 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Confirmed Positive Cases

71,314

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date  

945,194

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date  

1,029,511

**Currently Hospitalized 

561

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations

5,562

Identified Deaths in the Past 24 hours

0

Total Cumulative Deaths

912

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

**This number is a combination of hospitalized positive cases and hospitalized persons under investigation, as reported by hospitals at the time of the report. The data reflect a change in calculation and should not be compared to prior data. 

***The purpose of publishing aggregated statistical COVID-19 data through the OSDH Dashboard, the Executive Order Report, and the Weekly Epidemiology and Surveillance Report is to support the needs of the general public in receiving important and necessary information regarding the state of the health and safety of the citizens of Oklahoma. These resources may be used only for statistical purposes and may not be used in any way that would determine the identity of any reported cases.

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2020-09-15 at 7:00 a.m.

Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

Press Release by Jeremy Westby 2911 Media

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Four-time Grammy award winner and Grammy Hall of Fame inductee, B.J. Thomas is celebrating the 45th anniversary of his classic number one hit "(Hey Won't You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song." Written by Larry Butler and Chips Moman, B.J. Thomas reached the top of the Billboard charts in 1975 and was ranked the Number 17 top song for 1975, winning a Grammy Award for Best Country Song in 1976. The single, just as relevant and catchy in the 1970s as it is today, invites listeners into a world where love leaves one lonely and the only thing that heals is the sweet simple melodies of a song.

“(Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song,” was the last song we recorded for the “Reunion” album and I am so glad it was included. It was produced by Chips Moman and the Memphis Boys and is the longest title to top the Hot 100 charts. Thanks for the #1!”

Originally entering the Billboard Hot 100 in 1975, "(Hey Won't You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song," ended up becoming B.J. Thomas’ second #1 hit. After reaching the top of Billboard’s Easy Listening chart, this classic single solidified B.J. Thomas’ place in not only country music, but Pop music as well. Some songs come along that slow time down to speak to the heart. This single shoots through the origins of time to deliver craft and conviction along with a feel-good intention.

To keep up with everything BJ Thomas, follow his socials linked below and visit HERE.


About B.J. Thomas:
Four-time Grammy award winner and Grammy Hall of Fame inductee, B.J. Thomas has sold over 70 million albums worldwide with a total of 8 #1 hits and 26 Top 10 singles throughout his 50 years in the music industry. As one of Billboard’s Top 50 Most Played Artists Over The Past 50 Years, B.J. Thomas’ hits include “Raindrops Keep Fallin’ On My Head,” “Hooked On A Feeling,” “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry,” “I Just Can’t Help Believing,” “(Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song,” “Don’t Worry Baby,” “Whatever Happened To Old Fashioned Love” and “New Looks From An Old Lover.”

Monday, 14 September 2020 19:54

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19 September 14, 2020

OSDH Health Advisory

As of this advisory, there are 70,223 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. 

There are no additional deaths identified to report. 

There are 905 total deaths in the state.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Confirmed Positive Cases

70,223

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date  (As of Sept 11)

920,176

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date  (As of Sept 11)

1,000,912

**Currently Hospitalized (As of Sept 11)

499

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations

5,466

Identified Deaths in the Past 24 hours

0

Total Cumulative Deaths

905

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

**This number is a combination of hospitalized positive cases and hospitalized persons under investigation, as reported by hospitals at the time of the report. The data reflect a change in calculation and should not be compared to prior data. 

***The purpose of publishing aggregated statistical COVID-19 data through the OSDH Dashboard, the Executive Order Report, and the Weekly Epidemiology and Surveillance Report is to support the needs of the general public in receiving important and necessary information regarding the state of the health and safety of the citizens of Oklahoma. These resources may be used only for statistical purposes and may not be used in any way that would determine the identity of any reported cases.

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2020-09-14 at 7:00 a.m.

Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

An announcement from Eastern Oklahoma Medical Center's CEO, Bob Carter, RN.

Since March, we have witnessed the economic hardship that has been placed on many of our citizens here in LeFlore County due to COVID-19. People have lost jobs; lost insurance coverage & have been left with feelings of helplessness.


What if you get sick? How will you afford an office visit? These are real issues that families struggle with every day. To help relieve some of the financial burden placed on our community members, Eastern Oklahoma Medical Center will be reducing the cash price for an office visit with any of our Nurse Practitioners or Physician Assistants to $50.00.


We feel that it is our job to take care of the citizens of LeFlore County and to always provide the best healthcare possible.

Give us a call today and set up an appointment with one of our providers listed below. (918)647-8161.

Come and see the EOMC Difference!

Linda Hoffman -Heavener Medical Clinic Ed Wemmerus – Family Medical Clinic Crystal Ollie- Family Medical Clinic Krystel Huddleston- Family Medical Clinic Tamra Wright- Family Medical Clinic Tiffany Griffis- Cavanal Medical Clinic

 

Monday, September 14- Hamburger Steak, Green Beans, New Potatoes.

Tuesday, September 15- Boneless Wings, California Veggies, Mashed Potatoes, Rolls.

Wednesday, September 16- Cajun Turkey, Spring Veggies, Texas Potatoes.

Thursday, September 17- Breaded Pork Chops, Antigua Veggies, Baby Bakers, Garlic Bread.

Friday, September 18- Chicken Fried Steak, Carrots, Mashed Potatoes, Chicken Noodle Soup.

Saturday, September 19-  Grill and Salad Bar only.

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