Eating & Dining

Press Release

WASHINGTON, May 21, 2020 – Every year, millions of Americans commemorate Memorial Day to honor the sacrifices so many have made to protect our country. This holiday weekend might not be like past years, so while we keep public health recommendations in mind, let’s not forget food safety practices to prevent foodborne illnesses.

“Memorial Day is the unofficial start of the summer season,” says Dr. Mindy Brashears, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Under Secretary for Food Safety. “This summer may look different than most, and you can protect your family from foodborne illness and other illnesses during your summer celebrations by avoiding large gatherings, practicing social distancing, and washing your hands regularly.”

For those who choose to celebrate outdoors, USDA recommends the following food safety tips to keep your outdoor activities safe and fun this Memorial Day weekend.

Remember the Summer Season

Summer weather can be hot and humid, which means your food won’t stay safe as long as it could indoors. When the temperature outside is above 90°F, perishable food such as meat and poultry, dips and cold salads, or cut fruits and vegetables are only safe out on the table for one hour. According to a recent USDA survey, nearly 85 percent of participants said they don’t nest cold foods in ice when they serve it. Keeping cold foods cold is an important step to keep food safe and healthy, so store them on ice, in coolers, or in your fridge and freezer.

In the same survey, 66 percent of participants indicated they did not keep their cooked foods, like burgers and hot dogs, warm after cooking. Just like cold foods, hot perishable foods should be kept warm (above 140°F) until they’re eaten. You can easily do this by moving these items to the side of your grill away from the main heat source, rather than taking them off the grill entirely. Make sure your grilled meat and poultry reach a safe internal temperature first by using a food thermometer.

Know Your Outdoor Environment

You may have everything you need in an indoor kitchen to be food safe, but the same may not be true for your outdoor grill or other food preparation space.

“Now that summer is finally here, many are choosing to move their meals outside,” says USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) Administrator Paul Kiecker. “Prepare your outdoor spaces so they are food safe. If you won’t have running water, use hand sanitizer or moist towelettes to keep your hands clean before, during, and after food preparation.”

It’s most effective to use warm, soapy water to wash hands for at least 20 seconds before and after handling food. If you have to use hand sanitizer, make sure to choose one that contains at least 60 percent alcohol. Using moist towelettes and paper towels can help to clean and sanitize any cutting boards or utensils while you’re outside or away from your kitchen. Keeping hands and surfaces clean when handling food will help lessen the spread of germs and foodborne illness causing bacteria.

With these tips in mind, it’s easy to avoid foodborne illness and other illnesses during your summer celebrations. For any food safety questions this summer, call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) or chat live at ask.usda.gov from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday. Remember food safety to have a safe and happy Memorial Day weekend!

From the Oklahoma State Health Department 

 

For 1 in 6 Oklahomans, knowing where their next meal is coming from is a challenge outside of a crisis. As COVID-19 continues to present new challenges for our community, food security is finding its way to the top. If you are struggling to meet your individual or family nutritional needs, systems have been set up to give you some relief from the worry and stress that accompanies hunger.

Here are a few resources to get you started:

• Use the Oklahoma 2-1-1 Resource Directory to see a list of COVID-19 specific food resources near you. These resources are updated with the most current information, including which locations are still open and providing food boxes.


• Check out your local school district’s website for information on meal availability. All schools participating in the National Free and Reduced School Lunch Program have been given permission to continue serving breakfast and lunch “grab and go” style. A list was also compiled and published by News 9 last week with a summary of hours, locations and information by school site.


If you are still unsure where to go for help, please reach out and ask. COVID-19 is challenging us as individuals, families and communities. Don’t let figuring out where your next meal is coming from add to that stress. Give us a call at 1-877-215-8336, and let us give you a hand.

Tuesday, 25 February 2020 21:57

Talihina Pancake Supper

Press release

Do you like Breakfast for Supper?  If so you are going to love this. 

The Talihina Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Center is sponsoring A Pancake Supper March 6th from 5pm until 7pm at the Choctaw Nation Community Center.

  Supper includes Pancakes, eggs, sausage or bacon and a drink for $6.00. 

Please come join us for a great meal and help support your Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Center.

For more information on this event contact the Talihina Chamber of Commerce at 918-567-3434 or e-mail

Monday, 27 January 2020 21:54

EOMC Menu for 01/29/2020-02/01/2020

Tuesday, January 28- Chicken Fried Steak, Chicken Cordon Bleu, Carrots, Mashed Potatoes, Gravy, Chicken Noodle Soup.

Wednesday, January 29- Cajun Turkey, Brats, Fried Cabbage, 5 Blend Veggies, New Potatoes, Broccoli & Cheese Soup.

Thursday, January 30- Ham, Garlic & Cracked Pepper Chicken, Provence Veggies, Scalloped Potatoes, Chicken & Wild Rice Soup.

Friday, January 31- Brisket, Corndogs, Italian Veggies, Baby Bakers, Mac & Cheese, Corn Bread, Pinto Beans.

Saturday, February 1- Grill and Salad Bar Only.

 

Men hoping to get in shape typically know that getting fit requires a combination of diet and exercise. While it might be easy to adapt to a new exercise regimen, many men find it difficult to alter their diets. But a healthy diet does not have to be drab. The following are some healthy foods that men can enjoy on their way to improving their overall health.

 

* Turkey: Each ounce of skinless turkey breast contains seven grams of muscle-building protein, which should interest those men looking to improve their physique. Turkey often has no saturated fat and is even high in vitamin B and zinc.

 

* Beans: Beans are loaded with protein and contain no saturated fat. Men who want to get the most bang for their bean should consider black beans, which have the most fiber per serving. Fiber swells in your stomach and makes you feel full, which can quell any hunger pangs you get during the day. This can help you avoid overeating.

 

* Sweet potatoes: Sweet potatoes are a staple of Thanksgiving dinner, but they can be enjoyed year-round, too. Sweet potatoes protect the body against cell damage because they're loaded with nutrients such as beta carotene, iron and vitamins C and E. Sweet potatoes also help your body's muscles recover after a tough workout.

 

* Beef: Beef might not be the first food men think of when they're trying to get in shape and improve their overall health, but beef is loaded with nutrients, including protein, B6 and B12, niacin, phosphorous, and selenium. When buying beef, look for lean cuts. They should not be too difficult to find, as the United States Department of Agriculture notes that today's beef is 20 percent leaner than it was as recently as a decade ago.

 

* Yogurt: Men who need to shed a few pounds should consider yogurt, which contains calcium thats help the body feel full as it effectively burns fat. In addition, yogurt contains active cultures that increase the amount of germ-fighting bacteria along the intestinal walls. Studies have linked those cultures to a reduced risk of getting a cold, so you might just avoid a cold while you're losing some weight.

 

* Spinach: Popeye ate spinach, and men looking to get in shape and stay healthy should follow suit, as spinach is loaded with calcium, fiber and beta carotene, which boosts your immune system.

 

* Oatmeal: Eating healthy can start in the morning with a bowl of oatmeal. It contains ample soluble fiber that can reduce a man's risk of developing heart disease by helping reduce your cholesterol levels. If plain oatmeal is too drab, add some fruit like strawberries, bananas or blueberries, which contain more fiber, vitamins and minerals per ounce than any other fruit.

Saturday, 18 January 2020 13:24

EOMC Cafeteria Menu for 01/19/2020-01/25/2020

 

Sunday, January 19- Lasagna, Rotisserie Chicken, Peas, Mashed Potatoes, Gravy, Garlic Bread.

Monday, January 20- Manwich, Lemon Pepper Chicken, Carrots, Garlic & Herb Potatoes, Chili with beans.

Tuesday, January 21- Turkey, Smothered Pork Chops, Dressing, Green Bean Casserole, Mashed Potatoes, Gravy, Rolls, Broccoli Cheese Soup.

Wednesday, January 22- Red Beans & Rice, BBQ Chicken, Normandy Veggies, Fried Potatoes, Chicken Gumbo.

Thursday, January 23- Chipotle Sliders, Bourbon Chicken, Provence Veggies, Loaded Mashed Potatoes, Shrimp Bisque Soup.

Friday, January 24- Roast, Lil Smokies, Corn, New Potatoes, Chicken Poblano Soup.

Saturday, January 25- Grill and Salad Bar Only.

Friday, 27 December 2019 08:56

Sausage Casserole

Sausage Casserole

Submtted by Dixie Shrum


1 (8 oz) pkg. elbow macaroni, prepared according to pkg directions and drained
1 lb. bulk pork sausage, browned and drained of all fat (reserve 2 tbs fat and ½ of sausage)
½ c chopped onion
½ c green pepper strips
3 tbs all-purpose flour
½ tsp salt
2 c milk
2 c shredded Cheddar cheese

Saute’ onion and green pepper in reserved fat. Stir in flour and salt. Slowly add milk. Cook over medium heat, stirring, until thick. Stir in 1 ½ c cheese.
Combine macaroni cheese/sausage mixture into a greased 2 qt. casserole. Top with remaining cheese and sausage. Bake at 400o for 25 minutes or until golden brown.

 

Don Shrum and Dixie Bishop were married on August 21, 2957, in Poteau. They moved to their present home March 21, 1958 and have lived their sixty-two years. They are the parents of three daughters, Donna Deaton (David), Darla Davis and Deanna Davis, six grandchildren Daryl Davis (Kaycee), Delaina Davis & Daren Davis, and Lauren, Larissa & Logan Deaton and three great grandchildren Tanner, Kix and Ben.


Dixie attended school at Monroe in sixth and seventh grade. The Shrum daughters and three of the six grandchildren graduated from Monroe School. Now two of the great-grands are Monroe students. Don drove a bus for sixteen years and Dixie drove a bus for about eight year for Monroe School. Darla has taught at Monroe her entire career. We have good thoughts and memories of all our Monroe times.


God continues to bless all of us with good health and in numerous other ways. Mr. & Mrs. Shrum are members of Springhill Baptist Church. 

Friday, 27 December 2019 08:53

Sausage Casserole

Submitted by Dixie Shrum

 

Sausage Casserole
1 (8 oz) pkg. elbow macaroni, prepared according to pkg directions and drained
1 lb. bulk pork sausage, browned and drained of all fat (reserve 2 tbs fat and ½ of sausage)
½ c chopped onion
½ c green pepper strips
3 tbs all-purpose flour
½ tsp salt
2 c milk
2 c shredded Cheddar cheese

Saute’ onion and green pepper in reserved fat. Stir in flour and salt. Slowly add milk. Cook over medium heat, stirring, until thick. Stir in 1 ½ c cheese.
Combine macaroni cheese/sausage mixture into a greased 2 qt. casserole. Top with remaining cheese and sausage. Bake at 400o for 25 minutes or until golden brown.

 

 

Don Shrum and Dixie Bishop were married on August 21, 2957, in Poteau. They moved to their present home March 21, 1958 and have lived their sixty-two years. They are the parents of three daughters, Donna Deaton (David), Darla Davis and Deanna Davis, six grandchildren Daryl Davis (Kaycee), Delaina Davis & Daren Davis, and Lauren, Larissa & Logan Deaton and three great grandchildren Tanner, Kix and Ben.


Dixie attended school at Monroe in sixth and seventh grade. The Shrum daughters and three of the six grandchildren graduated from Monroe School. Now two of the great-grands are Monroe students. Don drove a bus for sixteen years and Dixie drove a bus for about eight year for Monroe School. Darla has taught at Monroe her entire career. We have good thoughts and memories of all our Monroe times.


God continues to bless all of us with good health and in numerous other ways. Mr. & Mrs. Shrum are members of Springhill Baptist Church.

 
These are not original recipes from the Shrum home but have been favorites for many years.

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT

Local Daycare participates in CACFP


The First Christian Church Daycare in Poteau announces its participation in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). All participants in attendance are served meals at no extra cha ge to the parents. In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights relations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering LJSDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint (AD-3027) found online or at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

(1) mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;
This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

 

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