Health & Wellness

PRESS RELEASE from the FDA

Company Announcement

Apotex Corp is voluntarily recalling all lots of Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-Release Tablets, USP 500mg within expiry to retail level. Apotex was notified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) that one lot of Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-Release Tablets, USP was tested and showed results for N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) levels in excess of the Acceptable Daily Intake Limit (ADI) and recommended recall of the one tested lot. Apotex Corp has agreed to recall this lot, and out of an abundance of caution, the company is extending the recall to all lots of Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-Release Tablets in the US. Apotex stopped selling this product in the US in February 2019, and there remains only limited product on the market. To date, Apotex has not received any reports of adverse events related to use of the product.

Risk Statement: NDMA is classified as a probable human carcinogen (a substance that could cause cancer) based on results from laboratory tests. NDMA is a known environmental contaminant and found in water and foods, including meats, dairy products, and vegetables.

Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-Release Tablets, USP is a prescription oral product indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults and pediatric patients 10 years of age and older with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The affected Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-Release Tablets, USP can be identified by NDC numbers stated on the product label.

Product

Strength

Pack Size

NDC Number

Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-Release Tablets, USP

500mg

100's Bottle

60505-0260-1

Wholesalers, Distributors and Retailers should return the recalled product to the place of purchase. Anyone with an existing inventory of the product should quarantine the recalled lots immediately. Customers who purchased the impacted product directly from Apotex can call Inmar Rx Solutions at 1-888-985-9014 (option 1) (9:00am – 5:00-pm, EST Monday thru Friday), to arrange for their return.The affected Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-Release Tablets were distributed nationwide in the USA to Warehousing Chains. Apotex Corp. is in a process of notifying its affected direct account Wholesaler, Distributor, Chain Distribution and Warehousing Chains via mail (FedEx Standard Overnight) by mailing a recall notification letter and is arranging for return of all recalled product.

Consumers with questions regarding this recall can contact Apotex Corp. by phone at 1-800-706-5575 (8:30am – 5:00pm, EST Monday thru Friday) or email address Consumers should contact their physician or healthcare provider if they have experienced any problems that may be related to taking or using this drug product.

Adverse reactions or quality problems experienced with the use of this product may be reported to the FDA's MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program either online, by regular mail or by fax.

Complete and submit the report Online

Regular Mail or Fax: Download form or call 1- 800-332-1088 to request a reporting form, then complete and return to the address on the pre-addressed form, or submit by fax to 1-800-FDA-0178

This recall is being conducted with the knowledge of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Today's weekly Oklahoma COVID-19 Weekly Report is now available.

This week, the State surpassed its goal to collect and test more than 90,000 specimens in the month of May. As of Friday, May 29, the Oklahoma State Department of Health has processed a total of 188,665 tests since COVID-19 was first detected in early March. For more information on testing in Oklahoma, click here. 

Reports from weeks past can be found here.

COVID-19 Tests Performed & Percent Positive (Cumulative Totals)

tests

 

Downward trajectory of positive tests as a percent of total tests within a 14-day period (flat or increasing volume of tests).

As of this advisory, there are 6,338 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. 

There are three additional deaths; two of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the other died on May 23.

  • One in Oklahoma County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • Two in Tulsa County, both males in the 65 and older age group. 

There are 329 total deaths in the state.

The State has surpassed its goal to collect and test more than 90,000 specimens in the month of May. As of Wednesday, May 27, the Oklahoma State Department of Health had processed 113,264 specimens collected for COVID-19 testing since the first of the month, with a total of 183,632 tests conducted since COVID-19 was first detected in early March. For more information on testing, click here.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Confirmed Positive Cases

6,338

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date 

181,060

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date

188,665

**Currently Hospitalized

160

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations

982

Deaths in the Past 24 hours

2

Total Cumulative Deaths

329

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

**This number is a combination of hospitalized positive cases and hospitalized persons under investigation, as reported by hospitals at the time of the report. The data reflect a change in calculation and should not be compared to prior data. 

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2020-05-29 at 7:00 a.m.

Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

Wednesday, 27 May 2020 14:50

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19 May 27, 2020

As of this advisory, there are 6,229 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. 

There are four additional deaths; zero of them occurred in the past 24 hours all died between March 25-May 25.

  • Two in Tulsa County, one male in the 65 and older age group and one female in the 65 and older age group.
  • Two in Washington County, both females in the 65 and older age group. 

 There are 322 total deaths in the state.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

 

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Confirmed Positive Cases

6,229

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date 

172,409

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date

179,842

**Currently Hospitalized

156

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations

962

Deaths in the Past 24 hours

0

Total Cumulative Deaths

322

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

**This number is a combination of hospitalized positive cases and hospitalized persons under investigation, as reported by hospitals at the time of the report. The data reflect a change in calculation and should not be compared to prior data. 

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2020-05-27 at 7:00 a.m.

Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

As of this advisory, the State of Oklahoma has reported a total of 6,137 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19. Since our last Situation Report, the following number of positive cases were published daily at coronavirus.health.ok.gov:

  • Saturday – 111 new positives for a total of 5,960
  • Sunday – 77 new positives for a total of 6,037
  • Monday – 53 new positives for a total of 6,090
  • Tuesday – 47 new positives for a total of 6,137

There are seven additional deaths; zero of them occurred in the past 24 hours all died between May 22-May 24.

  • Two in Oklahoma County, one male in the 65 and older age group and one female in the 65 and older age group. 
  • Three in Tulsa County, one male in the 65 and older age group, one female in the 65 and older age group and one male in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Grady County, a female in the 36-49 age group. 
  • One in Jackson County, a male in the 65 and older age group. 

There are 318 total deaths in the state.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Confirmed Positive Cases                                                                 6,137

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date (As of 5/22)          153,804

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date (As of 5/22)      160,903

**Currently Hospitalized (As of 5/22)                                             174

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations                                                  941

Deaths in the Past 24 hours                                                            0

Total Cumulative Deaths                                                                318

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals.

**This number is a combination of hospitalized positive cases and hospitalized persons under investigation, as reported by hospitals at the time of the report. The data reflect a change in calculation and should not be compared to prior data.

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.

*As of 2020-05-26 at 7:00 a.m.

Saturday, 23 May 2020 12:11

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19 May 23, 2020

  • As of this advisory, there are 5,960 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. 
  • There are four additional deaths; none of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between May 13-May 21.
    • One in Oklahoma County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
    • Three in Tulsa County, one male in the 65 and older age group, one female in the 65 and older age group and one male in the 50-64 age group.
  • There are 311 total deaths in the state.
  • This week's Oklahoma COVID-19 Weekly Report is now available. Reports from weeks past can be found here.
  • COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.
  • For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.
  • In recognition of Memorial Day, all OSDH offices and county health departments will be closed and a media advisory will not be released on Monday (5/25). 

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Confirmed Positive Cases

5,960

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date 

153,804

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date 

160,903

**Currently Hospitalized 

174

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations

932

Deaths in the Past 24 hours

0

Total Cumulative Deaths

311

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

**This number is a combination of hospitalized positive cases and hospitalized persons under investigation, as reported by hospitals at the time of the report. The data reflect a change in calculation and should not be compared to prior data. 

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2020-05-23 at 7:00 a.m.

Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

Press Release written by Joseph Jones (Madigan Army Medical Center) MADIGAN ARMY MEDICAL CENTER, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.

COVID-19 has changed many of our daily routines in a way no one anticipated. Many of us are at home more to minimize exposure. Isolation and being at home can illicit the temptation to eat snacks high in sodium, junk food and low-quality meals that provide instant gratification for our taste buds rather than nutrient-dense whole foods that can also be delicious. This is a challenge for many in these times of social distancing and self-isolation.

A day that may have previously included many steps, physical activities like walking from your car at your workplace parking lot twice per day, shopping for groceries, outings with the family or visiting shopping mall are absent for many. With this unprecedented lifestyle shift, there is a potential for the normalization of a more sedentary lifestyle packed with activities like watching television, sitting while reading for long periods, or sitting at your computer for longer-than-usual periods of time. We must stay proactive, and in some cases creative, to maintain an active lifestyle in the era of social-distancing. Even if you are not directly affected by COVID-19, or tested positive, it no doubt has had a drastic impact on your day-to-day routine, which could negatively affect your overall health.

So what are some things we can do to maintain a healthy and active lifestyle and routine while the world around us has adapted to limiting exposure to COVID-19?

  • Stay active:The gyms may not be open, however, there are lots of safe alternatives to getting physical activity without going against the preventive best practices recommended by the CDC like social distancing and avoiding large crowds. Aerobics can be done successfully at home. Another important point to consider is that avoiding crowds does not mean avoiding nature. Going for a brisk walk or jog outside in uncrowded areas outdoors is still considered relatively safe.  Push-ups, sit-ups, jumping-jacks and more exercises are great ways to stay fit away from the gym. For more ideas, visit:

https://www.aflcmc.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/2147181/staying-physically-active-during-covid-19/

  • Adequate sleep:Good sleep is essential to our overall health. According to The National Institutes of Health (NIH), a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the nation’s leading medical research agency: “Immune system activation alters sleep, and sleep in turn affects the innate and adaptive arm of our body's defense system.”  While the amount of sleep needed for good health and optimum performance mostly depends on the individual, the CDC recommends adults age 18-60 years get seven or more hours of sleep per night.
  • Diet and nutrition:Practicing self-discipline and avoiding “emotional eating” due to stress that may be related to the drastic changes surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic and how it affects our lives is imperative. According to the CDC, whole foods like dark, leafy greens, oranges and tomatoes—even fresh herbs—are loaded with vitamins, fiber and minerals. Make it a habit to try to eat more whole nutritious foods instead of processed snacks or fast food.
  • Self-care:Take time to take care of yourself. Be supportive and suggest the same for those close to you. Meditation, relaxation, quality time with family, personal care of yourself promotes overall wellness. The Defense Health Agency (DHA) has free, evidence-based, self-care tools developed by psychologists that you can check out here: https://health.mil/About-MHS/OASDHA/Defense-Health-Agency/Operations/Clinical-Support-Division/Connected-Health/mHealth-Clinical-Integration
  • Healthcare maintenance:If you have medications prescribed for any condition, be sure to take them as directed by your provider. Chronic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, asthma and many others should be kept in check with taking your medications as prescribed. Be sure to reach out to your healthcare team with any concerns as well. In the age of COVID-19, telehealth solutions are available if you want to speak with a provider about a health concern unrelated to COVID-19.
  • Cope with stress and anxiety:Positively cope with stress and anxiety induced by new precautions we must all now take to combat the spread of COVID-19 in our communities. Positive coping mechanisms would include exercise, meditation, reading, further developing certain skills or hobbies etc. Use this era to increase your daily repetition of these positive activities and develop new or even betterroutines than you may have adhered to prior to the emergence of the current COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Stay connected:Talking with loved ones while in isolation can help reduce the anxiety and instances of feeling down. Take time to utilize the multitudes of technologies and apps (many free) that can help you stay in touch with those you love. Our busy lives before the COVID-19 may have limited how often we connected with distant loved ones, now’s the time to fully exploit these modern capabilities for fellowship, companionship, and camaraderie.

The guidance above is to improve overall health and wellness. Please be aware that although eating nutritious foods, physical activity, adequate rest and taking care of our mental health makes us more resilient, it’s not a cure nor does it guarantee immunity from contracting COVID-19. In addition to these suggestions, first and foremost be sure to practice CDC guidance on social distancing, self-care, self-quarantine, wearing of cloth masks when social distancing is not possible and talking with your provider about any concerns you may have regarding your health. If you have a medical emergency, visit an emergency room. If you have an injury or illness unrelated to COVID-19, be sure to visit an Urgent Care Center.

Living through a global pandemic while adapting to new circumstances, like social distancing, can cause distress in anyone.

“We all need social connection, and being separated can make people feel more isolated and lead to depressive symptoms like low mood, poor concentration, lack of or too much sleep,” said Kelly Blasko, a clinical psychologist at the Defense Health Agency. “It is easy to feel overwhelmed, and that can lead to other mental health concerns such as anxiety and worry.”

Addressing mental health issues early can prevent potential problems down the line.

“We need to look at medical readiness holistically with mental health as just one aspect of overall health,” said Blasko. “Just like preventive measures are used to reduce the chances of a physical injury, there are preventive measures to reduce the chances of poor mental health.”

Mobile mental health tools, including apps, can provide valuable resources and support to people experiencing anxiety during the COVID-19 crisis.

“These health technologies can help during the in-between times of seeing your provider and can continue to improve the symptoms [of anxiety or depression],” explained Blasko, who is the lead for mobile health clinical integration at the DHA’s Connected Health branch.

Connected Health has developed mobile health tools and published several articles and research on the benefits of using digital health in clinical care, including guidelines on integrating mobile mental health tools into clinical practice.

The DHA’s mobile apps, listed here, are free and available for anyone to download from app stores for Android and Apple devices. There are apps that enhance self-care, and others that are a companion to treatment with a health care provider.

“Many self-care apps can be used without ongoing treatment. For example, Breathe2Relax teaches diaphragmatic breathing that is a skill we all can use to reduce stress.” said Blasko. “The Military Health System is expanding its virtual health services during this time and beneficiaries should check directly with their providers to see what options are available for them,” she added.

Blasko cautioned that mental health apps should never replace help from a health care provider.

“It is always good to seek help from a professional if you are worried about your mental health,” she said, noting the Military Crisis Line is available for urgent mental health issues. “These tools can be a way to develop daily coping skills and self-care habits. It is important to know how a mobile app is going to be helpful before relying on it for self-care.”

As of this advisory, there are 5,849 confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. 

There are three additional deaths; one of them occurred in the past 24 hours and the others died between May 17-May 20.

  • One in Oklahoma County, a female in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Tulsa County, a male in the 65 and older age group.
  • One in Texas County, a male in the 50-64 age group. 

There are 307 total deaths in the state.

COVID-19 testing sites are open in multiple cities in Oklahoma as a result of a cross-county, city and state health system partnership. Visit this page for updated dates and locations.

For more information, visit coronavirus.health.ok.gov.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Confirmed Positive Cases                                                    5,849

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date                 146,022

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date              152,998

**Currently Hospitalized                                                      190

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations                                       926

Deaths in the Past 24 hours                                                 1

Total Cumulative Deaths                                                       307

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

**This number is a combination of hospitalized positive cases and hospitalized persons under investigation, as reported by hospitals at the time of the report. The data reflect a change in calculation and should not be compared to prior data. 

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2020-05-22 at 7:00 a.m.

Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

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