Health & Wellness
Monday, 22 February 2021 18:37

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19 February 22, 2021

OSDH Advisory

  • As of this advisory, there are 419,853 cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.
  • 797 is today's 7-day rolling average for the number of new cases reported.
  • All deaths reported today are from Jan. 1-16, 2021.
  • There are 22 additional deaths identified to report.
    • One in Adair County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
    • Three in Carter County, one female in the 65 or older age group, two males in the 65 or older age group.
    • One in Cherokee County, one female in the 50-64 age group.
    • One in Cleveland County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
    • One in Comanche County, one male in the 50-64 age group.
    • One in Creek County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
    • One in Kay County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
    • One in Noble County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
    • Five in Oklahoma County, two females in the 65 or older age group, two males in the 50-64 age group, one male in the 65 or older age group.
    • One in Ottawa County, one female in the 50-64 age group.
    • Two in Pottawatomie County, one female in the 65 or older age group, one male in the 65 or older age group.
    • One in Rogers County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
    • Two in Tulsa County, two males in the 65 or older age group.
    • One in Washington County, one male in the 65 or older age group.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Cases 419,853
*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date (as of 02/19/21) 2,996,195
*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date (as of 02/19/21) 3,388,179
Acute Care OSDH Licensed Facility Hospitalizations (as of 02/19/21) 620
Other Types of Facilities Hospitalizations (as of 02/19/21) 73
Total Cumulative Hospitalizations 23,684
Total Cumulative Deaths 4,203

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. As a result, counts are subject to change. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

***The purpose of publishing aggregated statistical COVID-19 data through the OSDH Dashboard, the Executive Order Report, and the Weekly Epidemiology and Surveillance Report is to support the needs of the general public in receiving important and necessary information regarding the state of the health and safety of the citizens of Oklahoma. These resources may be used only for statistical purposes and may not be used in any way that would determine the identity of any reported cases.

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2021-02-22 at 7:00 a.m.


Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

OSDH Advisory

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19

This week, 62 Oklahoma counties are in the “orange" risk level, 14 are in the "yellow" risk level, and one is in the "green" risk level for the COVID-19 Risk Level System. OSDH continues to monitor closely the statewide hospitalization trends for COVID-19.

The COVID-19 Risk Level System will be updated every Friday in the Situation Update at 11:00 a.m. This week’s map can be seen in this update below the test results chart.

As OSDH continues to meet with stakeholders across the state, the COVID-19 Alert Map is subject to further revisions as science and public health guidance advances with the ongoing pandemic.

As of this advisory, there are 417,345 cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

932 is today's 7-day rolling average for the number of new cases reported.

There are 20 additional deaths identified to report.

  • One in Canadian County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Carter County, two females in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Comanche County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Creek County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Delaware County, one female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Harmon County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Four in Oklahoma County, two females in the 65 or older age group, two males in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Ottawa County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Pawnee County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Rogers County, one male in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Seminole County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Texas County, two males in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Tulsa County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Wagoner County, one male in the 50-65 age group.
  • One in Washington County, one female in the 65 or older age group.

There are 4,132 total deaths in the state.

Additional hospitalization data can be found in the Hospital Tiers report, published evenings Monday through Friday.

Register online to receive a notification when you're eligible to schedule a COVID-19 vaccine appointment at vaccinate.oklahoma.gov.

For more information, visit https://oklahoma.gov/covid19.html.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Cases

417,345

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date

2,992,254

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date

3,383,210

Acute Care OSDH Licensed Facility Hospitalizations

663

Other Types of Facilities Hospitalizations

65

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations

23,537

Total Cumulative Deaths

4,132

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. As a result, counts are subject to change. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

***The purpose of publishing aggregated statistical COVID-19 data through the OSDH Dashboard, the Executive Order Report, and the Weekly Epidemiology and Surveillance Report is to support the needs of the general public in receiving important and necessary information regarding the state of the health and safety of the citizens of Oklahoma. These resources may be used only for statistical purposes and may not be used in any way that would determine the identity of any reported cases.

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2021-02-19 at 7:00 a.m.

COVID-19 Risk Level System

alert level 2 18

As of Feb. 18, 2021

Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

The weekly Oklahoma COVID-19 Weekly Report for February 12-18 is now available.

Oklahoma’s current trend with new positive cases continues to reflect community transmission, which can be reduced by keeping 6 feet of physical distance from others, wearing face coverings when around individuals from outside the household, avoiding touching your face, and regular hand-washing.

Oklahoma currently ranks 23rd in the number of total reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S. and 7th in the cumulative incidence (per 100,000 persons) of reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S.

It is critical for Oklahomans to seek out testing, with or without symptoms. Diagnostic testing is freely available to all Oklahomans, and we continue to improve our ability to find and diagnose COVID-19 cases through our contact tracing efforts. If you are diagnosed with COVID-19, a public health worker may try to contact you; the need to adhere to instructions to quarantine and isolate remain critically important.

Reports from weeks past can be found here.

For more information, visit Oklahoma.gov/COVID19.

 

Patch Press Release

EXCLUSIVE OP-ED: President Joe Biden shares his national strategy to fight COVID-19 with Patch readers.

Written by President Joe Biden, Patch Community Contributor

We've been in the teeth of the COVID-19 pandemic for nearly a year now. Schools closed. Businesses closed. Millions of Americans infected and hospitalized, and tragically over 480,000 of our fellow Americans have lost their lives, and counting.

Overcoming this pandemic must be our top priority as a nation. And while scientists have come through for us by developing safe and effective vaccines in record time, we need more than just a medical miracle to come out of this pandemic. We need to pull off a manufacturing and logistical miracle, too. That's why my Administration hit the ground running on day one with a plan to purchase an adequate vaccine supply, work with providers to ramp up production, set up vaccine centers across the country, and mobilize a massive effort to administer shots in every community.

As a result, we are now on track to exceed our goal of administering 100 million shots in my first 100 days in office. We've increased vaccine supply to states by over 50 percent since my Administration began. We've seen the 7-day rolling average of vaccinations increase from 892,000 shots per day when I took office to 1.7 million shots per day in just four weeks. And where we were hundreds of millions of doses short on supply just one month ago, we're now on track to have enough supply for 300 million Americans by the end of July. 

You can check out our national strategy here to see for yourself how we plan to bring an end to this crisis, but here are the key points.

We're increasing the supply and getting more vaccines out to states, tribes, and territories more quickly.

We're mobilizing more vaccinators, including retired doctors and nurses, and federal medical personnel that we use in disaster relief efforts.

We're creating more places where people can get vaccinated – new mass vaccinations sites at stadiums, community centers, and large parking lots across the country, and sending vaccines to pharmacies and community health centers in the hardest-hit and most underserved parts of America to ensure that the vaccine is administered equitably. That wasn't happening before; now it is.

There's a lot more work to do, and it'll take time to get back to normal. And as we make progress every day, I know people have a lot of questions and a lot of worry. That's why the most important part of our plan to beat this pandemic is to be honest about our successes and our setbacks. To that end, we want to make sure you hear directly from the experts, who can answer some of the most commonly asked questions about the vaccines.

Take a look:

1. When will I able to be vaccinated?

The short, probably unsatisfying answer is that it's going to vary state-by-state. We are working to vaccinate as many Americans as possible as quickly as possible, moving every day to increase the available vaccine supply, increase the number of places where people can get vaccinated, and increase the number of people available to administer vaccines. Right now, only prioritized populations can receive the vaccine. Check the vaccine website in your state to see if you're eligible. We purchased enough vaccine to have supply for every adult in the United States by the end of July, but the speed with which we can administer those vaccines will come down to how robust our vaccination program is. That's why there's another $20 billion for vaccine distribution in the American Rescue Plan.

– Jeff Zients, Coordinator, COVID-19 Response Team

2. Who's actually paying for the vaccines? Do they cost anything?

I want to be very clear: no one can be denied a vaccine because they can't afford it. That's true now, and it will be later. Equity is one of the key planks of our COVID strategy – we want to prevent disparities based on race, gender or income, and making the vaccine free is key to that. Right now, vaccine providers can charge administration fees, which are usually paid for by your insurance. If you don't have insurance, those fees are currently paid for by a special fund that is probably more technical than you're interested in. The upshot is that someone pays for the fees, and it's not you. However, the American Rescue Plan, if passed by Congress, has funds to ensure the vaccine is free for everyone – whether you have insurance or not.

– Andy Slavitt, Senior Advisor, COVID-19 Response Team

3. When I'm vaccinated, why can't I stop wearing a mask? And is it safe to be around my elderly parents once they're vaccinated?

Even if you've received both doses of vaccine, you need to continue to wear a mask and practice social distancing. While the vaccine is extremely effective at preventing you from getting sick from the disease, it is not yet clear that it's effective at stopping transmission of the disease. What that means is that you might spread COVID-19, even after you've been vaccinated. So, it's critical that you continue to wear a mask and social distance when in public or in your home with others that don't live with you – even when you're around others who have been vaccinated. We must all do our part to protect each other, and as the science matures and we learn more, we will provide information to the public on lessening requirements for people who have been fully vaccinated. For example, this past week, CDC issued new guidance that states people who have been fully vaccinated and meet certain criteria are no longer required to quarantine following an exposure to someone with COVID-19.

– Dr. Rochelle Walensky, Director, CDC

4. Why do some vaccines require one dose but others require two? Do they work the same?

Both the Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines are messenger RNA – or mRNA – vaccines that have been shown to be 94% to 95% efficacious is preventing symptomatic disease. They contain genetic material designed to generate a protein called the "spike" protein found on the surface of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The immune system recognizes the spike protein as part of the virus and mounts a robust immune response that protects against the virus. To be most effective, both of these vaccines require two shots. Multiple-dose vaccinations are not a new concept; for example, the vaccines for shingles, HPV, and hepatitis B also require multiple vaccinations.

The Janssen COVID-19 vaccine requires only a single shot and uses a harmless human adenovirus to express the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. The immune system recognizes the spike protein as part of the virus and launches an immune response that protects against the virus. That vaccine was found to be 85% effective at preventing severe COVID-19 and 100% effective at preventing death. The FDA is currently reviewing data on the Janssen vaccine to determine whether it should be authorized for emergency use in the United States.

The bottom line is that while the vaccines may use different technologies to teach the human immune system to recognize SARS-CoV-2, any authorized COVID-19 vaccine will be highly effective at preventing one from getting sick or dying from COVID-19. And so, regardless of whether it is a two-dose vaccine or a single-dose vaccine, get vaccinated as soon as any vaccine becomes available to you to protect against COVID-19.

– Dr. Anthony Fauci, Chief Medical Advisor to the President

5. How are you making sure that these vaccines are being delivered fairly?

Equity underpins our entire pandemic response. The fact is that people of color, low-income communities, rural communities, and frontline workers are disproportionately impacted by this pandemic, so we need to make sure that they are given access to this vaccine at proportionate rates. That's why we're investing in community vaccination sites and mobile clinics, and distributing vaccines directly to pharmacies and community health centers in under-served communities. We want to bring the vaccine to where people are. It's going to take investments, but we believe we can deliver this vaccine both widely and fairly.

– Dr. Marcella Nunez-Smith, Chair, COVID-19 Health Equity Task Force

6. Should I be worried about these new variants? Can we stop them?

Emerging variants appear to spread more easily and may lead to an increase in cases; both are reasons for concern. Fortunately, the science to date suggests that the same prevention actions apply, but we must remain vigilant and do our part. This includes wearing a well-fitting mask that completely covers your nose and mouth, social distancing when around others who don't live with you, and avoiding travel, crowds, and poorly ventilated spaces. New variants underscore something critical: we must continue to reduce the number of COVID-19 cases in our communities. The more virus in the community, the more opportunity for new variants to emerge and spread. The best way to stop mutations is to vaccinate as much of the public as quickly as possible along with practicing prevention actions like mask wearing and social distancing. The more people we get vaccinated, the less likely these variants are to spread, which is among the very reasons we have laid out a robust vaccination plan.

– Dr. Walensky

7. When will we get our stimulus checks?

Right now, the House is negotiating the pieces of the American Rescue Plan package in their committees. After that, a similar process will happen in the Senate. Once that's done, the President is looking forward to signing it, and a few weeks following, people will begin receiving their stimulus checks.

– David Kamin, Deputy Director, National Economic Council

8. Has anything really changed in the last four weeks?

A lot has changed.

First, for the first time since the pandemic began, we have a comprehensive, whole of government national strategy to tackle this crisis. One that puts the full resources of the federal government to work with those on the ground fighting this pandemic. And one that puts equity at the center to ensure that our communities of color, our rural neighbors, those living with disabilities and seniors are not left behind in our efforts.

We are getting more shots in arms by allowing more people to get vaccinated for free, creating more places for people to get vaccinated, mobilizing more people to get shots in arms, and increasing vaccine supply.

We are for the first time ever standing up federally run mass vaccination sites that can do over 30,000 shots a week in our most disadvantaged neighborhoods. We have deployed mobile clinics and are making vaccines available in local pharmacies to reach the hardest hit communities.

We've authorized the use of the Defense Production Act to help manufacture more vaccines and vaccination supplies, which is one of the reasons why we're making progress on getting more people vaccinated every day. In fact, we've already increased supply to states by over 28 percent and by the end of July, we will have enough vaccine supply for every American adult.

We're protecting travelers by requiring masks on public transportation including planes, trains, and buses. We're also requiring testing for all incoming international travelers as well as self-quarantine and testing upon arrival.

For the first time in a year-long pandemic, we have given schools the scientific guidance they need to safely reopen and stay open.

We're not kidding ourselves: we have a lot of work still to do. But we're already seeing progress and we're going to keep working until we put this pandemic behind us.

– Natalie Quillian, Deputy Coordinator, COVID-19 Response Team

9. I'm waiting to see how the vaccine works. Has there been any new data since the study?

Both the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, which are authorized for emergency use in the United States, are highly effective (94%-95%) at preventing symptomatic COVID-19. As time goes on, we will learn how long that protective effect lasts. The most common side effects after vaccination have included injection site pain, fatigue, headache, muscle and joint pain, and some have reported running a fever. These side effects are more common after the second dose, and younger adults, who have more robust immune systems, have reported more side effects than older adults. Typically, these side effects resolve after a day or two. All the data so far indicate that that the vaccines are highly effective and that any serious side effects are very rare.

With the emergence by mutation of new variants of SARS-CoV-2, we are working to determine how the authorized vaccines protect against those variants. So far, the evidence suggests that both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines provide significant protection against the B.1.1.7 variant that first emerged in the United Kingdom and perhaps a somewhat reduced level of protection against the B.1.351 variant that first appeared in the Republic of South Africa. We are continuing to analyze the effects of the variants on the effectiveness of the vaccines to determine if future changes to the products will be needed to keep up with the evolution of the virus.

– Dr. Fauci

10. When do things go back to normal?

We can get back to some degree of normality, but it's going to take all of us working together to do our part – wearing well-fitting masks, social distancing, and getting vaccinated when it's your turn. The fact of the matter is that manufacturing, distributing, and administering the vaccine is going to be a herculean challenge. We've secured enough doses so that by the end of July, everyone who wants a vaccine will be able to get it. And, I'm pushing my team to be as aggressive as possible.

It's also why my American Rescue Plan is so critical. We have to mount a national vaccination program up to the scale of the challenge we face.

We have all got to do our part and pitch in to end this virus. We still need you to social distance, wear a mask, and get yourself and your loved ones vaccinated. The only way out is through. And the only way through is together.

There's simply nothing more important than getting the resources we need to vaccinate people in this country as quickly as possible. We're not going to get our economy back in shape and millions of people back to work and our schools and businesses fully reopened until we beat this virus.

We're in a national emergency. This will be one of the most difficult operational challenges we have ever undertaken as a nation. We have to stay vigilant. We have to stay focused. And we have to remember who we are: The United States of America. We have the resources. We just have to choose to use them.

We can do this.

So, thank you very much for your patience. We're going to get this done. And I'll always be open and honest about exactly where we are on this — you can count on that.

Keep the faith,

President Biden

 

Friday, 19 February 2021 08:10

INCREASING COVID-19 VACCINE CONFIDENCE

Press Release

UNITED STATES OF CARE HOSTS WEBINAR WITH KAISER FAMILY FOUNDATION AND LEADING EXPERTS TO DISCUSS VACCINE CONFIDENCE, EQUITY AND INCREASING PUBLIC CONFIDENCE 

(Washington, DC) – United States of Care hosted a webinar yesterday to discuss recent research on vaccine confidence and effective ways to communicate to the public about the vaccine, its distribution, and the need to get vaccinated. Presentations highlighted the “wait and see” populations unique concerns and motivations. 

“During this critical phase of vaccine education and distribution, it’s especially important to help concerned people make their choice. Getting all the facts and weighing the information is truly what smart health decision-making looks like. We’re eager to help people along that path — and congratulate them when they make their choice,” said Natalie Davis, co-Founder, Managing Director, Public Engagement for United States of Care.

On the call, participants discussed recent data released by the Kaiser Family Foundation that examined adults who are considered “wait and see” for the vaccine, as well as how likely communities of color are to receive a vaccination.

Dr. Mollyann Brodie,  Executive Vice President & Chief Operating Officer at the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation and Executive Director of KFF’s Public Opinion and Survey Research Program said, “The three in ten adults who put themselves in the ‘wait and see’ group have real concerns and questions about the vaccine. If trusted messengers such as health care providers are the ones answering their real information needs, that many more people are likely to conclude that getting vaccinated is the right choice for themselves and their families.”

The webinar also featured Dr. Rhonda Medows, President of Population Health Management at Providence, one of the largest nonprofit health systems in the United States, and CEO of Ayin Health Solutions. Also, Dr. Lisa Fitzpatrick, Founder and CEO of Grapevine Health, an Infectious disease physician, CDC-trained medical epidemiologist, and health activist.  Medows and Fitzpatrick discussed the attitudes of communities of color toward the vaccine.

 

“Although, I may be a physician, I admit that even I started in the ‘hell no’ vaccine box and had to think long and hard about getting the COVID-19 vaccine. Ultimately what led me to take the shots and advocate for others to do the same was that I was able to learn all the facts behind the vaccines’ development and saw firsthand the devastating toll that the pandemic has taken on Black, Latinx, Indigenous, and Native communities,” said Dr. Rhonda Medows. “In my family alone, we’ve lost ten people to COVID-19, sadly that’s not at all unusual in communities of color.”

Dr. Lisa Fitzpatrick added, “To continue moving people along the vaccine acceptance continuum, trusted, credible information about the vaccine must be delivered by credible messengers in places where Black Americans are consuming health information. Rather than perpetuating narratives about vaccine hesitancy, we should be focusing our energy and resources into ensuring the Black community has answers to lingering questions about the vaccine.”

All participants stressed that people’s concerns about the vaccine are real and they deserve empathetic, straightforward answers as they consider whether the vaccine is right for them. Understanding and addressing these concerns now, early in the national vaccination process, is key for overall equitable vaccine uptake and protecting the most vulnerable. United States of Care assembled studies and research findings in a newly released memo.


"There is no one-size-fits-all approach to increasing COVID-19 vaccine uptake. Inclusion is key, both with respect to messages and their sources. In order to ensure the best vaccination rates, we need to make an effort to understand what makes people concerned in the first place,” concluded Dr. Matt Motta, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Oklahoma State University.

Press Release

OKLAHOMA CITY – State Rep. Carol Bush, R-Tulsa, today passed a bill in committee that would establish regulations for health care providers wishing to participate in Medicaid within Oklahoma.

House Bill 1091creates the Ensuring Access to Medicaid Act and establishes the conditions for which health care providers in Oklahoma will participate in the program, including the claims process, payment timeframes and rates, authorizations for treatment and more.

“If the state moves forward with a managed care model for Medicaid, we must ensure Oklahomans still have access to quality health care,” Bush said. “This bill would put in statute contract provisions the Health Care Authority would have to establish to protect the rights of qualifying participants.”

Oklahomans in June passed a state question allowing for the expansion of Medicaid to include low-income adults between the ages of 18 and 65 whose income does not exceed 133% of the federal poverty level and who are not already covered by Medicaid. The governor next directed the Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA) to seek proposals from managed care organizations to manage the state’s Medicaid plan. The plan to this point has been managed by the OHCA. Last week, the governor announced he and the authority have selected four managed care organizations to run the program: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Oklahoma, Oklahoma Complete Health, Humana Health Horizons and UnitedHealthcare. His goal, he said, is to improve Oklahoman’s health outcomes.

The plan could still be contested by the Legislature, but in the meantime, Bush said her goal is to protect Oklahomans should the plan proceed.

HB 1091 requires that s a condition of any proposed or potential plan participating in capitated managed care, the OHCA shall require the following contract provisions:

  • 90% of all claims shall be paid within 14 days of submission to the plan;
  • Authorizations shall be facilitated within 24 hours for inpatients transferring to post- and long-term acute-care facilities;
  • All plans shall offer network contracts to all community providers designated as essential by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services;
  • All plans shall offer payment rates to contracted providers that are no lower than the fee schedule of OHCA in effect on the date of service;
  • All plans shall formally credential and re-credential physicians or other providers at a frequency that may be less than once in three years;
  • All funds appropriated to OHCA shall be used in accordance with legislative intent; and
  • Plan reviews and determinations for prior authorization must be timely and in accordance with established guidelines.

HB 1091 passed the House Appropriations and Budget Committee with a vote of 31-0. It now is eligible to be considered by the full House.

DEQ Press Release

Due to Oklahoma’s historic weather event, drinking water systems statewide have been impacted. Many systems throughout the state are experiencing issues related to water loss, and DEQ anticipates that once temperatures rise above freezing and frozen pipes begin to thaw, many more systems and customers will be affected.  It is likely that DEQ’s emergency storm response will continue for several weeks.

When a water system experiences extremely low or no water pressure, DEQ recommends a precautionary boil advisory to ensure that people have safe water for drinking, cooking, handwashing and bathing.

“Unfortunately, we expect the number of precautionary boil advisories and, potentially, mandatory boil orders to increase over the next few days. In order to assist Oklahoma’s drinking water systems, the State Environmental Laboratory will be operating seven days a week to analyze additional samples to ensure safe water,” said Shellie Chard, DEQ’s Water Quality Division Director.

If someone has extremely low water pressure or total water loss, it is important that they notify their water service provider as quickly as possible and follow these recommendations:

  • Once the water comes back on, flush the water for five minutes or until fresh, clear water comes out of the tap.
  • Boil the water at a hard, rolling boil for at least one minute before consumption, drinking, use in food preparation (including baby formula), brushing teeth, making ice, wound care, and bathing infants who may ingest the water, or use another drinking water source such as bottled water until the tap water is safe to drink again.
  • It is recommended to continue boiling the water (or use bottled water) for at least 72 hours or until your water system says the water is safe to drink again, whichever comes later.

In order to protect the health of their customers, drinking water systems routinely issue precautionary boil orders when there are known leaks in the system. Mandatory boil orders are issued by DEQ when there is a violation of state and federal drinking water regulations.

For more information on statewide precautionary and mandatory boil orders, you may visit DEQ’s website at www.deq.ok.gov or follow DEQ on FacebookTwitter and Instagram.

Thursday, 18 February 2021 15:41

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19 February 18, 2021

OSDH Advisory

Vaccine POD Closures: Due to inclement weather, several COVID-19 vaccine PODs are closed or have adjusted hours. Check our website for Inclement Weather Updates.

As of this advisory, there are 416,476 cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

1,011 is today's 7-day rolling average for the number of new cases reported.

There are 23 additional deaths identified to report.

  • One in Cleveland County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Comanche County, one female in the 36-49 age group.
  • One in Grady County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Kay County, one male in the 50-64 age group.
  • Four in Oklahoma County, one male in the 50-64 age group, three males in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Pontotoc County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Three in Pottawatomie County, two females in the 50-64 age group, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Rogers County, one female in the 50-64 age group, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Stephens County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Six in Tulsa County, one female in the 36-49 age group, one female in the 65 or older age group, one male in the 50-64 age group, three males in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Wagoner County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Washington County, one female in the 65 or older age group.

There are 4,112 total deaths in the state.

Additional hospitalization data can be found in the Hospital Tiers report, published evenings Monday through Friday.

Register online to receive a notification when you're eligible to schedule a COVID-19 vaccine appointment at vaccinate.oklahoma.gov.

For more information, visit https://oklahoma.gov/covid19.html.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Cases

 

416,476

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date

 

2,987,185

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date

 

3,378,127

Acute Care OSDH Licensed Facility Hospitalizations

 

705

Other Types of Facilities Hospitalizations

 

67

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations

 

23,464

Total Cumulative Deaths

 

4,112

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. As a result, counts are subject to change. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

***The purpose of publishing aggregated statistical COVID-19 data through the OSDH Dashboard, the Executive Order Report, and the Weekly Epidemiology and Surveillance Report is to support the needs of the general public in receiving important and necessary information regarding the state of the health and safety of the citizens of Oklahoma. These resources may be used only for statistical purposes and may not be used in any way that would determine the identity of any reported cases.

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2021-02-18 at 7:00 a.m.

Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

American Lung Association Press Release

Stair climb event to raise money to end lung disease, COVID-19

OKLAHOMA CITY – (February 17, 2021) – Today, the American Lung Association in Oklahoma announced that it will host the iconic Fight For Air Climb event outdoors for the first time at Wantland Stadium, home of the University of Central Oklahoma Bronchos, on May 1.

The event typically takes place in the stairwells of Valliance Tower but was reimagined as an outdoor climb challenge for the safety of participants, volunteers and staff. The organization is also offering a “Climb Your Way” option for those who can’t make it to the physical event.

Registration is now open for the event, which invites individuals, families, groups of friends, corporate teams and first responders to tackle the stadium stairs, totaling 794 steps.

“Without missing a beat, we are headed outdoors, onward and upward for our legacy Fight For Air Climb event,” said Terri Bailey, executive director of the Lung Association. “During this time, it is more important than ever to support lung health, so on May 1, we are climbing to bring an end to COVID-19, lung cancer and lung disease, and ensure healthy air for all.”

“Masks will be required at the event and social distancing will be practiced. The safety of participants, staff and volunteers is always our number one priority, so we are continually monitoring local conditions that might affect the Climb. Everyone is encouraged to check our Climb website for the most up-to-date information leading up to the event.”

Money raised at the Fight For Air Climb will fund the Lung Association’s efforts to end lung cancer and lung disease, as well as support the Lung Association’s COVID-19 Action Initiative. The COVID-19 Action Initiative is a $25 million investment to address COVID-19 and protect against future respiratory virus pandemics. The initiative works with public and private entities to increase research collaboration and develop new vaccines, detection tests and treatment therapies.

Registration for the Fight For Air Climb is $35 and includes a $100 fundraising minimum. For more information, and to register, visit FightForAirClimb.org/Oklahoma City.

 

About the American Lung Association

The American Lung Association is the leading organization working to save lives by improving lung health and preventing lung disease through education, advocacy and research. The work of the American Lung Association is focused on four strategic imperatives: to defeat lung cancer; to champion clean air for all; to improve the quality of life for those with lung disease and their families; and to create a tobacco-free future. For more information about the American Lung Association, a holder of the coveted 4-star rating from Charity Navigator and a Gold-Level GuideStar Member, or to support the work it does, call 1-800-LUNGUSA (1-800-586-4872) or visit: Lung.org.

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