Health & Wellness
Tuesday, 19 January 2021 19:22

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19 January 19, 2021

OSDH Advisory

As of this advisory, there are 358,374 cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

2,988 is today's 7-day rolling average for the number of new cases reported.

There are 43 additional deaths identified to report.

  • One in Blaine County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Caddo County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Canadian County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Cleveland County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Comanche County, one male in the 50-64 age group, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Craig County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Creek County, one male in the 50-64 age group.
  • Four in Delaware County, four females in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Garfield County, one female in the 65 or older age group, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Grady County, one male in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Jackson County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Logan County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Marshall County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Mayes County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Murray County, one female in the 65 or older age group, one male in the 50-64 age group.
  • Two in Muskogee County, one male in the 50-64 age group, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Noble County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Nowata County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Five in Oklahoma County, three females in the 65 or older age group, one male in the 50-64 age group, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Ottawa County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Pawnee County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Payne County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Pittsburg County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Stephens County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Five in Tulsa County, one female in the 50-64 age group, three females in the 65 or older age group, one male in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Wagoner County, one female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Washington County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Woodward County, one female in the 65 or older age group.

There are 3,037 total deaths in the state.

Additional hospitalization data can be found in the Hospital Tiers report, published evenings Monday through Friday.

For more information, visit https://oklahoma.gov/covid19.html.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Cases

358,374

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date (as of 01/15/21)

2,601,000

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date (as of 01/15/21)

2,943,409

Acute Care OSDH Licensed Facility Hospitalizations (as of 01/15/21)

1,684

Other Types of Facilities Hospitalizations (as of 01/15/21)

182

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations

20,095

Total Cumulative Deaths

3,037

The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. As a result, counts are subject to change. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

***The purpose of publishing aggregated statistical COVID-19 data through the OSDH Dashboard, the Executive Order Report, and the Weekly Epidemiology and Surveillance Report is to support the needs of the general public in receiving important and necessary information regarding the state of the health and safety of the citizens of Oklahoma. These resources may be used only for statistical purposes and may not be used in any way that would determine the identity of any reported cases.

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2021-1-19 at 7:00 a.m.

Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

Monday, 18 January 2021 11:36

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19 January 18, 2021

ODHS Advisory

As of this advisory, there are 356,816 cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

3,081 is today's 7-day rolling average for the number of new cases reported.

There are seven additional deaths identified to report.

  • One in Creek County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Grady County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Oklahoma County, one female in the 50-64 age group, one male in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Pottawatomie County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Seminole County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Tulsa County, one female in the 65 or older age group.

There are 2,994 total deaths in the state.

Additional hospitalization data can be found in the Hospital Tiers report, published evenings Monday through Friday.

For more information, visit https://oklahoma.gov/covid19.html.

 COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Cases

356,816

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date (As of 01/15/21)

2,601,000

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date (As of 01/15/21)

2,943,409

Acute Care OSDH Licensed Facility Hospitalizations (As of 01/15/21)

1,684

Other Types of Facilities Hospitalizations (As of 01/15/21)

182

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations

20,063

Total Cumulative Deaths

2,994

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. As a result, counts are subject to change. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

***The purpose of publishing aggregated statistical COVID-19 data through the OSDH Dashboard, the Executive Order Report, and the Weekly Epidemiology and Surveillance Report is to support the needs of the general public in receiving important and necessary information regarding the state of the health and safety of the citizens of Oklahoma. These resources may be used only for statistical purposes and may not be used in any way that would determine the identity of any reported cases.

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2021-1-18 at 7:00 a.m.

Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

The Poteau Chamber of Commerce is pleased to announce Hope Home Medical Supply as a new member.


Hope Home Medical Supply has been in business for over 12 years and are based in the Stigler Oklahoma Area.


The office opened in Poteau because they felt that this area of Oklahoma has been underserved for Durable Medical Equipment and Medical Supplies. HHMS offer Oxygen, Oxygen Supplies (24Hr service), CPAP, CPAP Supplies, Hospital Beds, etc.

Their Capability statement has most items they offer, but HHMS also offers any medical item you need (as long as it does not require a DEA number). HHMS outfitted a 4 patient NP Office with all the items they needed and save them over$15,000. They deliver and set up the items or can drop ship to the customers home or business.

HHMS participates in the Advantage program and will file all the patient’s insurance information. HHMS takes great pride in taking car of its patients and getting the right product in their homes. HHMS can do assessments of a patient’s home to help them determine their DME needs.

Unlike other DME's HHMS have Medical Professionals on staff to help.  The staff includes a RT, 2 RN's, and a Nurse Practitioner to help all patients. Eddie Scott and his staff at Stigler and The New Poteau Office.

Hope Home Health page 001 1

 

 

Home Medical Supply is excited to serve the Poteau Area at the new location at 900 N Broadway in Poteau

The weekly Oklahoma COVID-19 Weekly Report for January 8-14th is now available.

Oklahoma’s current trend with new positive cases continues to reflect community transmission, which can be reduced by keeping 6 feet of physical distance from others, wearing face coverings when around individuals from outside the household, avoiding touching your face, and regular hand-washing.

Oklahoma currently ranks 24th in the number of total reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S. and 9th in the cumulative incidence (per 100,000 persons) of reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S.

It is critical for Oklahomans to seek out testing, with or without symptoms. Diagnostic testing is freely available to all Oklahomans, and we continue to improve our ability to find and diagnose COVID-19 cases through our contact tracing efforts. If you are diagnosed with COVID-19, a public health worker may try to contact you; the need to adhere to instructions to quarantine and isolate remain critically important.

Reports from weeks past can be found here.

For more information, visit Oklahoma.gov/COVID19.

OSDH Weekly Epidemiology Report

John Hopkins 7 Day Average Cases and Antibody 01-14-2021

John Hopkins 7 Day Average Positivity Rate for Specimen and Antibody Cases.

Friday, 15 January 2021 15:34

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19 January 15, 2021

OSDH Advisory

This week, all 77 Oklahoma counties are in the “orange" risk level for the COVID-19 Risk Level System. OSDH continues to monitor closely the statewide hospitalization trends for COVID-19.

The COVID-19 Risk Level System will be updated every Friday in the Situation Update at 11:00 a.m. This week’s map can be seen in this update below the test results chart.

As OSDH continues to meet with stakeholders across the state, the COVID-19 Alert Map is subject to further revisions as science and public health guidance advances with the ongoing pandemic.

As of this advisory, there are 348,044 cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

3,923 is today's 7-day rolling average for the number of new cases reported.

There are 43 additional deaths identified to report.

  • One in Beckham County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Cherokee County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Choctaw County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Four in Cleveland County, two females in the 65 or older age group, one male in the 50-64 age group, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Comanche County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Creek County, one female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Dewey County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Three in Garfield County, three females in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Garvin County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Grady County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Harmon County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Kay County, one female in the 65 or older age group, one male in the 50-64 age group.
  • Two in Kingfisher County, one female in the 65 or older age group, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Murray County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Nowata County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Nine in Oklahoma County, two females in the 50-64 age group, one female in the 65 or older age group, two males in the 36-49 age group, four males in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Okmulgee County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Payne County, one male in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Sequoyah County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Stephens County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Texas County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • Seven in Tulsa County, one female in the 18-35 age group, two females in the 65 or older age group, four males in the 65 or older age group. 
  • One in Wagoner County, one female in the 65 or older age group.

There are 2,925 total deaths in the state.

Additional hospitalization data can be found in the Hospital Tiers report, published evenings Monday through Friday.

For more information, visit https://oklahoma.gov/covid19.html.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Cases

348,044

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date

2,589,408

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date

2,928,413

Acute Care OSDH Licensed Facility Hospitalizations

1,673

Other Types of Facilities Hospitalizations

174

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations

19,616

Total Cumulative Deaths

2,925

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. As a result, counts are subject to change. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

***The purpose of publishing aggregated statistical COVID-19 data through the OSDH Dashboard, the Executive Order Report, and the Weekly Epidemiology and Surveillance Report is to support the needs of the general public in receiving important and necessary information regarding the state of the health and safety of the citizens of Oklahoma. These resources may be used only for statistical purposes and may not be used in any way that would determine the identity of any reported cases.

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2021-1-15 at 7:00 a.m.

COVID-19 Risk Level System

alert jan 14 2021

As of Jan. 14, 2021

Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

Thursday, 14 January 2021 15:55

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19 January 14, 2021

OSDH Advisory

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19

As of this advisory, there are 344,506 cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

4,165 is today's 7-day rolling average for the number of new cases reported.

There are 34 additional deaths identified to report.

  • Two in Atoka County, one female in the 50-64 age group, one male in the 50-64 age group.
  • Three in Bryan County, three males in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Cleveland County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • Three in Comanche County, one female in the 50-64 age group, two males in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Creek County, one male in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Custer County, one female in the 36-49 age group.
  • One in Grady County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Greer County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Kay County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Kingfisher County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Marshall County, one female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in McIntosh County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Muskogee County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Oklahoma County, one female in the 65 or older age group, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Okmulgee County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Three in Pontotoc County, one female in the 50-64 age group, one male in the 36-49 age group, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Pottawatomie County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Pushmataha County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Rogers County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Sequoyah County, one female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Stephens County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Four in Tulsa County, one female in the 65 or older age group, two males in the 50-64 age group, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Wagoner County, one male in the 65 or older age group.

There are 2,882 total deaths in the state.

Additional hospitalization data can be found in the Hospital Tiers report, published evenings Monday through Friday.

For more information, visit https://oklahoma.gov/covid19.html.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Cases

344,506

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date

2,563,861

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date

2,898,461

Acute Care OSDH Licensed Facility Hospitalizations

1,674

Other Types of Facilities Hospitalizations

170

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations

19,460

Total Cumulative Deaths

2,882

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. As a result, counts are subject to change. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

***The purpose of publishing aggregated statistical COVID-19 data through the OSDH Dashboard, the Executive Order Report, and the Weekly Epidemiology and Surveillance Report is to support the needs of the general public in receiving important and necessary information regarding the state of the health and safety of the citizens of Oklahoma. These resources may be used only for statistical purposes and may not be used in any way that would determine the identity of any reported cases.

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2021-1-14 at 7:00 a.m.

Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

Press Release

Toyota Admits Conduct and Accepts Responsibility in Consent Decree; Agrees to Injunctive Relief and Civil Penalty

WASHINGTON (January 14, 2021) — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Department of Justice announced today that the United States has filed and simultaneously settled a civil lawsuit against Toyota Motor Corporation, Toyota Motor North America Inc., Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. Inc., and Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America Inc. (Toyota) for systematic, longstanding violations of Clean Air Act emission-related defect reporting requirements, which require manufacturers to report potential defects and recalls affecting vehicle components designed to control emissions. 

In connection with the settlement, the United States has filed a consent decree, agreed to by Toyota, that resolves the government’s complaint through Toyota’s payment of a $180 million civil penalty and the imposition of injunctive relief. The $180 million penalty is the largest civil penalty for violation of EPA’s emission-reporting requirements. The consent decree remains subject to a period of public comment and court approval.

“For a decade Toyota failed to report mandatory information about potential defects in their cars to the EPA, keeping the agency in the dark and evading oversight,” said Susan Bodine, EPA’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance Assistant Administrator. “EPA considers this failure to be a serious violation of the Clean Air Act.”

“This settlement is yet another important milestone settlement for this Administration, and it continues our unwavering commitment to ensuring that our environmental laws as written, including EPA’s regulations, are rigorously enforced,” said Jeffrey Bossert Clark, Assistant Attorney General of the Justice Department’s Environment and Natural Resources Division.

“For a decade, Toyota systematically violated regulations that provide EPA with a critical compliance tool to ensure that vehicles on the road comply with federal emissions standards,” said Audrey Straus, Acting U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York. “Toyota shut its eyes to the noncompliance, failing to provide proper training, attention, and oversight to its Clean Air Act reporting obligations. Toyota’s actions undermined EPA’s self-disclosure system and likely led to delayed or avoided emission-related recalls, resulting in financial benefit to Toyota and excess emissions of air pollutants. Today, Toyota pays the price for its misconduct with a $180 million civil penalty and agreement to injunctive relief to ensure that its violations will not be repeated.”

The complaint filed in Manhattan federal court today alleges that from approximately 2005 until at least late 2015, Toyota systematically violated Clean Air Act automobile defect reporting requirements designed to protect public health and the environment from harmful air pollutants.

Clean Air Act regulations require manufacturers to notify EPA by filing an Emissions Defect Information Report (EDIR) when 25 or more vehicles or engines in a given model year have the same defect in an emission control part or an element of design installed in order to comply with emission standards and other EPA regulations. The regulations also require vehicle manufacturers to file a Voluntary Emissions Recall Report (VERR) with EPA when they perform a recall to correct defects in emission-related parts, and to update EPA on the progress of such recalls through Quarterly Reports. These mandatory reporting requirements are critical to the Clean Air Act’s purpose of protecting human health and the environment from harmful air pollutants: They encourage manufacturers to investigate and voluntarily address defects that may result in excess emissions of harmful air pollutants, and provide EPA with important information about emission-related defects for use in its oversight of manufacturers.

For 10 years, Toyota routinely failed to comply with these reporting requirements. During that time, Toyota materially delayed filing an estimated 78 EDIRs, filing many only when disclosing non-compliance to EPA in 2015, at which point some were as much as eight years late. These EDIRs related to millions of vehicles with the potential to exhibit emission-related defects. Toyota also failed to file 20 VERRs and more than 200 quarterly reports.

During the period of noncompliance, Toyota managers and staff in Japan knew that Toyota was no longer attempting to determine whether it was aware of 25 instances of the same emission-related defect in a model year – the threshold requirement for filing an EDIR. Rather than follow this legally required standard, Toyota unilaterally decided to file EDIRs principally when Toyota was independently required to file distinct reports with California regulators under a less strict standard – a standard that EPA had rejected as too lenient when Toyota had previously proposed to rely on it for federal reporting.  Time and again, Toyota managers and staff in Japan identified the discrepancy between Toyota’s procedures and the plain language of the federal requirements but failed to bring Toyota into compliance. And Toyota’s American unit, responsible for submitting the reports to EPA, was well aware of red flags indicating Toyota’s noncompliance, but did not address the problem. As Toyota’s key U.S.-based employee wrote in one email: “As long as EPA is not asking about EDIR[s] then I do not want to change.” 

As a result of its conduct, Toyota deprived EPA of timely information regarding emission-related defects and recalls and avoided the early focus on emission defects contemplated by the regulations. Toyota’s conduct likely resulted in delayed or avoided recalls, with Toyota obtaining a significant economic benefit, pushing costs onto consumers, and lengthening the time that unrepaired vehicles with emission-related defects remained on the road.

Toyota admits, acknowledges, and accepts responsibility for what is included in the consent decree.

Between approximately 2005 and late 2015, Toyota routinely filed emission defect reports to EPA materially late and, in many cases, failed to file such reports at all until a self-disclosure of non-compliance in late 2015.

Representations to EPA
 

In March and May 2002, at EPA’s request, Toyota and EPA representatives met to discuss Toyota’s internal process for identifying whether 25 instances of a specific emission-related defect exist in vehicles or engines of the same model year, requiring an EDIR filing.

At a first meeting in March 2002, Toyota described its EDIR process in which Toyota would investigate whether it had 25 defects only upon receiving 25 “product reports” from its dealers, but would supplement that review by filing an EDIR upon receiving warranty claims for an emission-related part in 4 percent of Toyota’s California fleet (a threshold requiring a separate filing to state authorities under California law).

At the meeting, EPA rejected this EDIR process as not timely considering warranty claims, despite the incorporation of the 4 percent California trigger. Toyota’s notes of the meeting indicate that EPA program staff advised Toyota that if it came back with a revised proposal that the program staff were convinced would satisfy the regulations, then EPA’s enforcement arm would not need to get involved. Toyota then revised its process, noting internally that it “will be stricter than” California law.

At a May 2002 meeting with EPA, Toyota presented its revised process. Under that process, Toyota would commence an investigation to determine whether an EDIR filing was required when it had received warranty claims for an emission-related part for 1 percent of relevant vehicles nationwide; when it received 500 such warranty claims regardless of the percentage; or when it received twenty-five similar early warning reports.
Toyota noted internally that EPA seemed pleased with this approach, which EPA had described as “more stringent than California.” In 2003, 2004, and 2005, as part of an annual review, Toyota submitted its May 2002 process in writing to EPA as an overview of its EDIR reporting program.

Toyota’s Conduct from Approximately 2005 to 2015

Without notifying EPA, in approximately 2005, Toyota stopped following the May 2002 EDIR process. In approximately 2005, Toyota began filing EDIRs primarily when filing the California reports triggered by the 4 percent threshold. Toyota also filed EDIRs in a small number of instances when it was otherwise filing VERRs with EPA.

From approximately 2005 to 2015, Toyota stopped making any independent determination of whether 25 defects existed requiring an EDIR filing. Multiple times during this period, Toyota staff charged with preparing EDIRs identified that the plain language of the EDIR regulations called for filing an EDIR upon the identification of 25 defects, but that Toyota was not doing so. These staff did not cause Toyota to change its practice.

As a result of this conduct, Toyota filed at least 69 EDIRs materially late. Thirty-nine of these were filed materially late in the ordinary course of Toyota’s business. In late 2015, Toyota self-disclosed another 30 that had not been filed at all. Some EDIRs were ultimately filed as many as eight years after they were due.

Beyond EDIRs, Toyota also failed during this period to file 20 VERRs required for emission-related recall campaigns that it conducted and failed to file more than two hundred Quarterly Reports related to such campaigns. Between 2005 and 2015, Toyota failed to provide its employees with adequate training, resources, or oversight to ensure that Toyota complied with its reporting obligations to EPA. As a result of Toyota’s conduct, EPA did not timely receive mandated information regarding emission-related defects and recalls.

Pursuant to the consent decree, Toyota will pay a civil penalty of $180 million. The consent decree also requires Toyota to follow certain compliance and reporting practices designed to ensure timely investigation of emission-related defects and timely filing of EDIRs, VERRs, and quarterly reports with EPA. The consent decree imposes training, internal communication, and oversight requirements. Toyota will be subject to judicial oversight under this consent decree for at least three years, with additional reporting requirements to EPA for four and a half years.

Notice of this proposed consent decree will be published in the Federal Register and the public will have the opportunity to submit comments on the consent decree for a period of at least 30 days before it is submitted for the court’s approval.

To view the consent decree or to submit a comment, visit the Department of Justice website at: www.justice.gov/enrd/Consent_Decrees.html

For more information about this case please visit: https://www.epa.gov/enforcement/toyota-clean-air-act-emissions-defect-reporting-settlement-information-sheet

The Justice Department thanked the attorneys in EPA’s Air Enforcement Division, the program staff at EPA’s Office of Transportation and Air Quality, and the agents at EPA’s Criminal Investigative Division for their critical work on this case.

This case is being handled by the Environmental Protection Unit of the U.S. Attorney’s Office’s Civil Division. Senior Trial Attorney Keith Tashima with the Environment and Natural Resources Division’s Environmental Enforcement Section and Assistant U.S. Attorneys Robert William Yalen, Dominika Tarczynska, and Jennifer Jude of the Southern District of New York are prosecuting the case.


Wednesday, 13 January 2021 11:25

SITUATION UPDATE: COVID-19 January 13, 2021

OSDH Advisory

As of this advisory, there are 341,364 cases of COVID-19 in Oklahoma.

4,256 is today's 7-day rolling average for the number of new cases reported.

There are 44 additional deaths identified to report.

  • One in Beckham County, one female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Bryan County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Cherokee County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Cleveland County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Comanche County, two males in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Grady County, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Le Flore County, one male in the 50-64 age group.
  • Two in McIntosh County, two females in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Muskogee County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • Four in Oklahoma County, one female in the 36-49 age group, one female in the 65 or older age group, two males in the 65 or older age group.
  • Two in Okmulgee County, one male in the 50-64 age group, one male in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Osage County, one female in the 50-64 age group.
  • One in Pawnee County, one female in the 65 or older age group.
  • One in Rogers County, one female in the 65 or older age group.

18 in Tulsa County, one female in the 36-49 age group, eight females in the 65 or older age group, one male in the 50-64 age group, eight males in the 65 or older age group.

Four in Wagoner County, one female in the 65 or older age group, one male in the 50-64 age group, two males in the 65 or older age group.

One in Washington County, one female in the 65 or older age group.

One in Woodward County, one male in the 65 or older age group.

There are 2,848 total deaths in the state.

Additional hospitalization data can be found in the Hospital Tiers report, published evenings Monday through Friday.

For more information, visit https://oklahoma.gov/covid19.html.

COVID-19 Oklahoma Test Results

Cases

341,364

*Total Cumulative Negative Specimens to Date

2,548,026

*Total Cumulative Number of Specimens to Date

2,881,102

Acute Care OSDH Licensed Facility Hospitalizations

1,684

Other Types of Facilities Hospitalizations

172

Total Cumulative Hospitalizations

19,199

Total Cumulative Deaths

2,848

*The total includes laboratory information provided to OSDH at the time of the report. As a result, counts are subject to change. Total counts may not reflect unique individuals. 

***The purpose of publishing aggregated statistical COVID-19 data through the OSDH Dashboard, the Executive Order Report, and the Weekly Epidemiology and Surveillance Report is to support the needs of the general public in receiving important and necessary information regarding the state of the health and safety of the citizens of Oklahoma. These resources may be used only for statistical purposes and may not be used in any way that would determine the identity of any reported cases.

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.
*As of 2021-1-13 at 7:00 a.m.

Detailed case statistics are published on the website. Click here for more information.

Press Release

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Defense (DOD) today announced the purchase of 1.25 million additional treatment courses of Regeneron’s investigational monoclonal antibody therapeutic, a combination of casirivimab and imdevimab, to be delivered in the first half of 2021 to treat non-hospitalized, high-risk COVID-19 patients. This latest agreement brings the total supply of casirivimab and imdevimab purchased by HHS and DOD to over 1.5 million treatment courses.

Under the agreement announced in July to meet Operation Warp Speed goals, Regeneron is in the process of delivering the first approximately 300,000 doses of casirivimab and imdevimab. Following Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), HHS began allocating these doses November 23 to state and territorial health departments which, in turn, direct which healthcare facilities receive the infusion drug. An HHS treatment locator is now available showing where antibody therapeutics have been delivered.

“With COVID-19 cases continuing to rise, treating people with mild or moderate infections can help prevent hospitalizations, which will reduce the burden on healthcare systems,” said HHS Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response Robert Kadlec, M.D. “To ensure equitable and efficient distribution, we will continue coordinating with state and territorial health departments to get these additional therapeutics into the hands of healthcare providers quickly, with a focus on areas of the country currently hardest hit by the pandemic.”

Allocations to state and territorial health departments are based proportionally on confirmed COVID-19 cases in each state and territory over the previous seven days, based on data that hospitals and state health departments enter into the HHS Protect data collection platform. To date, the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) has allocated more than 127,700 treatment courses of the therapeutic.

These government-purchased doses are available at no cost to patients, although healthcare facilities could charge for administering the medicine – as is customary with such government-purchased products.

The Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), part of ASPR, provided approximately $2.63 billion to purchase the additional treatment courses, working in collaboration with the DOD Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense (JPEO-CBRND) and the Army Contracting Command.

Regeneron’s therapeutic treatment received an EUA from the FDA on November 21, 2020, for use in treating high-risk, non-hospitalized patients with mild or moderate confirmed cases of COVID-19.

Regeneron developed the treatment, a combination of two monoclonal antibodies called casirivimab and imdevimab, with preclinical and clinical development funded in part through a long-standing partnership with BARDA. Regeneron previously used its same proprietary technology to develop a novel triple monoclonal antibody treatment for Ebola, which in 2020 became the first FDA-approved treatment for Zaire ebolavirus.

Antibodies are a component of the human immune system. Monoclonal antibodies developed by Regeneron are made outside of the body by a single clone of cells or a cell line producing identical antibody molecules, and then delivered to patients via infusion or injection. The antibodies bind to certain proteins of a virus, reducing the ability of the virus to infect human cells.

To find out how much of the therapeutic treatment has been allocated to specific states, territories and jurisdictions, visit the allocation dashboard. This dashboard will be updated after each allocation while the U.S. government is engaged in the allocation and distribution process.

About Operation Warp Speed (OWS):

OWS is a partnership among components of the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Defense, engaging with private firms and other federal agencies, and coordinating among existing HHS-wide efforts to accelerate the development, manufacturing, and distribution of COVID-19 vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics.