Thursday, 24 May 2018 16:31

OSU holds off participation in state’s hemp pilot program for 2018 growing season Featured

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At this time, Oklahoma State University has not applied for a license and does anticipate applying for a license in time for this year’s industrial hemp growing season. At this time, Oklahoma State University has not applied for a license and does anticipate applying for a license in time for this year’s industrial hemp growing season.

By Sean Hubbard, Communications Specialist Agricultural Communications Services - OSU

 

STILLWATER, Okla– When Gov. Mary Fallin recently approved the emergency rules for the Oklahoma Industrial Hemp Agricultural Pilot Program, potential farmers across the state got excited about getting in on the ground floor of this new industry.


However, a key element of this pilot program allows Oklahoma universities and colleges to facilitate research on all aspects of growing industrial hemp. Industrial hemp is the same plant species as marijuana, but in order to qualify as industrial hemp, the plant must contain a very low concentration of THC, the psychoactive chemical in marijuana.

 

There is interest from the private sector in exploring the cultivation of industrial hemp for a number of uses. It is used for its fiber in a variety of ways. It has been proposed as an alternative forage for livestock, and there is interest in potential medical benefits, to name a few.

 

“At this time, Oklahoma State University has not applied for a license and we do not anticipate applying for a license in time for this year’s growing season,” said Tom Coon, vice president of OSU’s Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources.


Rather, OSU is taking a holistic approach on this new industry, evaluating agronomics, logistics, processing and economic feasibility. DASNR plans to spend the next six months gathering information, which may be used to develop Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service programming for the commercial growth of hemp.


Included in the legislation for the program are restrictions on entities that can legally grow industrial hemp.


Oklahoma colleges or universities with a plant science program that have applied for and been granted a license to grow industrial hemp are permitted. The license must be approved by the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry before the licensee can plant any seed.


Also, any entity that has an ODAFF-approved subcontract with a licensed college or university research program can legally grow hemp. There are detailed rules that must be followed for those interested in growing the crop as a subcontractor.


“There is a considerable amount of information that must be supplied in advance of approval to plant and grow a crop, including the exact location of the field or greenhouse, the ownership of the land or greenhouse, the intended disposition of the crop and a variety of additional information,” Coon said. “Anyone who is interested in growing as a subcontractor, or as a licensee if they are affiliated with a college or university, would be well advised to study the rules.”


Rules and the license and subcontractor application form can be found on ODAFF’s website, www.oda.state.ok.us


“Anyone inquiring about growing under an OSU license should be informed that we are not taking applications for subcontractors for the 2018 growing season,” Coon said. “We will be taking the next six months to develop our strategy to ensure the best possible outcome for Oklahoma hemp growers in the future.”


Those interested in staying up-to-date with OSU’s participation in the Oklahoma Industrial Hemp Agricultural Pilot Program, or in partnering with the university should it file for a license in the future, can fill out a form on the Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment Station website, www.oaes.okstate.edu/ind-hemp


The form asks for a name, company, address, contact information and nature of interest in the program.

Oklahoma State University, in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Executive Order 11246 as amended, and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Higher Education Act), the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and other federal and state laws and regulations, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, genetic information, sex, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, disability, or status as a veteran, in any of its policies, practices or procedures. This provision includes, but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid, and educational services. The Director of Equal Opportunity, 408 Whitehurst, OSU, Stillwater, OK 74078-1035; Phone 405-744-5371; email: has been designated to handle inquiries regarding non-discrimination policies. Any person who believes that discriminatory practices have been engaged in based on gender may discuss his or her concerns and file informal or formal complaints of possible violations of Title IX with OSU’s Title IX Coordinator 405-744-9154.

David Deaton

Digital Editor at Oklahoma Welcome

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